Careers in Music Production and Engineering

Below are some of the many careers a music production and engineering major can pursue.

Visit Berklee's Career Communities site to explore more roles by community, industry, program, or location.



Also called:

Acoustical Engineer

Description:

Acoustical consultants use the scientific understanding of how sound moves through space to help design and modify rooms, buildings, and more to meet their clients' needs.


Also called:

ADR Engineer, ADR Mixer

Description:

Automated dialogue replacement (ADR) recordists are recording engineers working in and around the film industry who specialize in re-recording dialogue in a studio setting.


Also called:

Assistant Recording Engineer, Second Engineer, Tape Op

Description:

The assistant engineer supports the lead recording engineer in all studio-related activities, from answering phones and coiling cables to tweaking outboard gear and prepping rough mixes. 


Also called:

Lead Audio Designer, Lead Sound Designer, Audio Lead, Senior Audio Developer, Senior Sound Designer

Description:

The audio director plans, organizes, and supervises the creation and implementation of all game audio while also working alongside a team as a senior audio developer. 


Also called:

Technical Sound Designer, Audio Programmer

Description:

An audio implementer is a coder and sound engineer who implements audio assets into a video game engine or similar interactive media project under the supervision of an audio director.


Also called:

Chief Engineer (Higher Level), Assistant B.E. (Lower Level)

Description:

Broadcast engineers are responsible for the strength, clarity, and overall quality of sounds and images broadcast on radio and television, and—increasingly—sound and image transmitted via satellite, cable, and the internet.


Description:

Dialogue editors handle the production, direction, and editing of dialogue for a film, television show, or video game project. In the video game industry, they might also be in charge of recording dialogue with voice actors.


Also called:

Club DJ, Deejay, Producer

Description:

DJs are skilled musical manipulators who use great ears, the latest software, and a spot-on feel for musical tastes and trends to build rousing dance sets for live audiences and create altered versions of tracks by other artists.


Description:

Field recordists capture sounds outside the controlled environment of a recording studio, to be used in sound effect libraries, plays, video games, films, and television.


Also called:

Live Audio Engineer, Front of House (FOH) Engineer, Monitor Mix Engineer

Description:

Live sound mix engineers are responsible for controlling the volume, balance, and EQ of a live performance from a mixing console.


Also called:

Sound Reinforcement Engineer, Concert Audio Tech

Description:

Live sound systems engineers are responsible for installing, optimizing, maintaining, and breaking down the sound systems used in live performances.


Description:

Mastering engineers use technical expertise and superb ears to make the final adjustments to a piece of recorded music before it's released, heightening its impact and ensuring that it will translate well to the variety of playback systems in use today. 


Also called:

Mix Engineer, Mixer

Description:

The mixing engineer is responsible for combining all of the different sonic elements of a recorded piece of music into a final version and balancing the distinct parts to achieve a desired effect.


Also called:

Location Sound Mixer, Location/Production Sound Recordist, Location/Production Sound Engineer

Description:

The production sound mixer is the leader of the production sound crew, responsible for recording high-quality audio on set and on location for film and television productions.


Also called:

DJ, Disc Jockey, Radio Host, Radio Announcer

Description:

Radio DJs play music, interact with listeners, interview artists, discuss current events, and more on broadcast, satellite, and internet radio stations.


Also called:

Mixer, Sound Mixer, Sound Effects Mixer, Foley Mixer, Dialogue Mixer

Description:

Re-recording mixers are postproduction audio engineers who combine separate audio elements—such as background, dialogue, and sound effects—to create the final audio track for a movie, television show, or advertisement.


Also called:

Music Producer, Producer

Description:

Record producers oversee and direct recording projects for musical artists. Although their roles vary by project, producers commonly help artists choose material and adapt arrangements, coach them in the studio, select and hire side musicians, work with the recording engineer, and weigh in on decisions about mixes.


Also called:

Audio Engineer, Studio Engineer

Description:

The recording engineer oversees many technical and aesthetic aspects of a recording session and is responsible for the overall sound of all recorded tracks, ensuring that the mixing engineer has good material to work with and that the final product satisfies the artists and producers.


Also called:

Audio Developer, Audio Designer, Sound Developer, Video Game Audio Engineer, Sound Effect Designer

Description:

Sound designers collect, edit, and create sound effects, ambient effects, and even music for video games, applications, or any other form of interactive media.


Description:

Theatrical sound designers are responsible for everything an audience hears during a theatrical production, from sound effects to the actors' voices.


Description:

Drawing on a deep knowledge base that spans acoustics, aesthetics, architecture, and the recording process, studio designers design and build recording studios.


Also called:

Studio Technician, Maintenance Technician, Staff Maintenance Engineer, Audio Maintenance Engineer

Description:

Often working while the studio sleeps, and always making repairs in a moment of crisis, studio maintenance engineers are unsung heroes who keep a studio’s audio electronics running.


Description:

Studio managers oversee the daily operations at a recording studio. Their duties run the gamut from studio and gear maintenance to business operations and customer relations.


Also called:

Studio Operator

Description:

Studio owners create or purchase a recording studio, hire the core staff, secure initial clients, and oversee the studio's growth. 


Also called:

Sound Editor, Sound Designer

Description:

Supervising sound editors are responsible for the finished sound in movies and television shows. The process involves selecting, polishing, and assembling three primary elements—recorded dialogue, sound effects, and music—into a complete, integrated soundtrack.


Also called:

Product Representative

Description:

Technology trainers and specialists work with colleagues and clients to help them become proficient using music or sound technology products, and demonstrate the capabilities of these products at industry events.


Also called:

Sound Assistant, Cable Person, Sound Maintenance, Cable Wrangler, A2

Description:

A versatile member of the production audio team in the film and television industries, the utility sound technician supports the production sound mixer and boom operator by assisting with the setup and maintenance of audio hardware, keeping the set quiet for capture, and helping resolve any audio problems that might arise.