David Doms

Associate Professor
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David Doms has a long history of teaching MIDI and music synthesis. At Berklee, he currently teaches Advanced Digital Sampling, Advanced MIDI Systems, and MIDI systems, and before coming to Berklee, he spent 10 years at the New England Institute of Art teaching music synthesis and MIDI. 

Doms has composed and produced television and radio commercials for regional and national broadcasts, corporate video, and film including music for NBC, Fox TV, Xerox, and Gillette. He is a published songwriter with Warner/Chappell and DSM Music. As a producer, musician, and songwriter, his work has appeared on numerous releases including those of Down Avenue (RCA), Robin Lane, Charles Pettigrew (formerly of Charles and Eddie), Laurie Geltman, and Ivan de Prume. His current project, Dreamtime9, is a combination of fuel-injected jazz- and blues-based songs, integrated with ambient laptop and spoken word. Doms performs regularly in the Boston area and is working on a new release with Dreamtime9.

  • Career Highlights
    • Composed and produced television and radio commercials for regional and national broadcasts, corporate video, and film, including music for NBC and Fox
    • Published songwriter with Warner/Chappell and DSM Music
    • Author of Berklee Online's Sampling and Audio Production course
    • As a producer, musician, and songwriter, has appeared on numerous releases, including those of Down Avenue, Robin Lane, Charles Pettigrew (formerly of Charles and Eddie), Laurie Geltman, and Ivan de Prume
  • Education
    • B.M., Boston University

In Their Own Words

"We're talking a lot in class about using the modern tool set that's available today—software like Pro Tools or Digital Performer, the major sequencing and digital audio applications that allow you to produce work. There's a lot of work to be had in doing soundtracks, commercial work, songwriting, and production. But one of the things we do in our department is talk about the core techniques in terms of finding your own sounds. There's a big tool set, but we're also looking at core ideas of how you would approach these tools."

"It's a nice spot to be in, to be able to draw back on some of the things in the analog world, some of the physical tools we've had post–world war to now, but also to have this whole digital tool set. It's pretty incredible. We've realized how crucial it is for the student to get exposed to this, even the ones who aren't synth majors. Part of what we do is to make sure those students get exposure and learn how to use what's on their laptop, which is pretty extensive."

"It's phenomenal. Today we're all very aware of the multiple styles that have emerged and fused together. It's really a fun time to be involved in teaching all this and also seeing what the students are up to. It's about influencing them and also having them influence us."