Sarah Kervin

  • Career Highlights
    • Solo artist and sidewoman in New York City
    • Performances at Lincoln Center and the Kennedy Center with Ben Folds, Manhattan Transfer, and Jon Hendricks, and at the Pre-Olympic Ceremonies, Beijing (2008)
    • Two full-length solo albums released, third coming in 2018
    • Created the music video for "The Least You Could Do" in partnership with the Joyful Heart Foundation
    • Composer of Hot Mess in Manhattan: The Musical (2016)
    • Pursuing an M.S. in speech language pathology
  • Awards
    • Winner of the Recording Festival, recording in Ireland at Grouse Lodge Studios (2017)
  • Education
    • M.M., University of North Texas, jazz studies and voice, 2012
    • B.M., University of South Carolina, jazz studies, saxophone, and voice, 2010

In Their Own Words

"My teaching philosophy is all about giving singers the technique they need to express themselves so they can focus on the song and not how to sing it. Once you internalize the technical skills, then it’s all about the music; that’s what’s important. No matter if it's rock, country, pop, jazz, musical theater, your voice serves your artistic expression. That's what vocal training is all about."

"I’m extremely passionate about vocal health. While my background was in jazz and classical music, when I started working in the professional world I was mostly singing pop gigs, like weddings, and I ended up having to see a voice therapist due to hoarseness from overwork. It really changed my focus as a performer and a teacher. So I prioritize giving my students all the skills and tools I possibly can, not only for good technique, but also good training for their vocal health so they can keep their voices healthy throughout their careers. I’m even pursuing a second master’s degree part time right now to become a speech language pathologist."

"My professional experience has been a mixed bag, from songwriting to musical theater to marching band and everything in between, and I think it gives me the ability to relate to a lot of different types of singers. The technique I’ve learned has given me the freedom to perform top 40s hits at a wedding gig, scat over jazz changes, and sing my original pop tunes with my band. Being well-rounded is a great skill for singers and has served me incredibly well in the professional world. In an ever-changing industry like the one today, you need as many skills as you can to succeed, and as a teacher I strive to give my students the tools they need to do the job they want to do, whether that’s producing, touring, studio work, teaching, writing, music therapy, or even a new niche job in the industry that they’re going to create themselves."