Jason Anick

Instructor

"There are a lot of basic elements of music that I want students to be able to translate to their instrument, no matter what style they end up playing. Learning scales, arpeggios, and good technique will help you tackle any style, but understanding them will also provide more dynamic means of musical expression."

"I started off playing classical violin, but early on I was inspired by improvisation. I loved the idea of creating a song or solo that's completely organic, but quickly realized that I needed to have the technical facility to execute my ideas. I knew I had to study and take that part seriously."

"I gravitated towards jazz, and my first jazz influence was Charlie Parker—a saxophone player. I know that people don't always think of the violin in a jazz setting, but that excited me. I could be a violin player in this setting and it would be a unique and special thing."

"When I teach students jazz I always encourage them to learn from other musicians in their ensembles, or give them suggestions for records to listen to and solos to transcribe, or encourage them to play with different instruments. That's how I learned. That's what worked for me. I try not to overwhelm them with harmonic concepts at first but instead help them build a solid foundation and understanding of what the music is all about."

Career Highlights

 

  • B.S., Acoustical Engineering and Music, Hartt Conservatory
  • Violinist and mandolinist
  • Leader of the Jason Anick Quartet
  • Member of the John Jorgenson Quintet
  • Performances with John Jorgenson, John McGann, Andreas Oberg, Christian Howe, Stephane Wrembel, Frank Vignola, Nat Reeves, and John Lockwood
  • Recordings include Sleepless (Jason Anick Trio) and One Stolen Night (John Jorgenson Quintet)
  • Publications include "Getting Started with Gypsy Jazz," Fiddle Magazine
  • Performances in China, Germany, the U.K., and the Netherlands, as well as renowned venues such as the Montreal Jazz Festival, Scullers, Yoshi's, and the Iridium