Liberal Arts Courses

LENS-P107

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simon Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: All degree students not taking LENS-P101, LENS-P103, LENS-P105, or LENS-P109
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: None
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

All first-year seminars share an emphasis on navigating the Berklee experience, building a foundation for success as a student and an artist, and creating a sense of community among students and faculty. This seminar’s unique focus is on the artist’s engagement with the community. Through in-class and service activities, students will learn about the connections between cultural, political, and social conditions and the needs of specific populations within the community. This course helps students discover and advocate for issues facing our community and creates a safe, reflective space for discourse and debate. It gives students tools to approach situations, to put their own and their classmates’ beliefs and values in context, expose their own biases, and examine the issues surrounding their service assignment through multiple lenses. Students will engage in weekly reflections activities and draw upon their skills and concerns as artists to reach for a more informed, nuanced, and open-minded grasp of the world. 

LENS-P109

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: All degree students not taking LENS-P101, LENS-P103, LENS-P105, or LENS-P107
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: None
Department Code: LART
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

All first-year seminars share an emphasis on navigating the Berklee experience, building a foundation for success as a student and an artist, and creating a sense of community among students and faculty. This seminar’s unique focus is on the city of Valencia and on the experience of studying abroad. Students explore Valencia including their immediate surroundings, and learn how historical and contemporary issues inform the city and its citizens. In addition, students learn about Berklee and the Boston Conservatory at Berklee. Students engage in activities with the goal of reflecting on the study abroad experience in order to increase their intercultural and interpersonal skills and foster personal growth. This course creates a safe, reflective space for discourse and debate. It gives students tools to put their own and their classmates’ beliefs and values in context, and explore their own biases. Students draw upon their skills and concerns as artists to reach for an informed, nuanced, and open-minded grasp of connections among a city, its people, history, and culture. 

LFRN-151

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: None
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

The emphasis of this course is on language acquisition: developing a basic level of oral and written comprehension and a certain degree of self-expression. The study of elementary French grammar will be fundamental to this class. Note: This course is not available to students for whom French is one of their primary languages and/or primary languages of instruction.

LFRN-252

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LFRN-151 or required placement test score
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course is a continuation of LFRN-151. The emphasis of the course is on continued language acquisition and on developing more advanced oral and written comprehension and self-expression. Students will expand their knowledge of grammar which is a fundamental aspect of this class. Note: This course is not available to students for whom French is one of their primary languages and/or primary languages of instruction.

LFRN-353

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LFRN-252 or required placement test score
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

In this course, students acquire oral and written communication skills in French. The topics presented are representative of French society and the Francophone world, and the communicative tasks are taught within the framework of authentic situations. Students learn to speak, listen, and write in personal, public, professional, and educational situations that simulate real life. Observation and reflection are at the core of the learning process. Students observe linguistic phenomena in the material provided and learn to deduct grammar rules from it. The true appropriation of language emanates from the students themselves. This class takes a hands-on and real-life approach to language acquisition. Note: This course is not available to students for whom French is one of their primary languages and/or primary languages of instruction.In this course, students acquire oral and written communication skills in French. The topics presented are representative of French society and the francophone world, and the communicative tasks are taught within the framework of authentic situations. Students learn to speak, listen, and write in personal, public, professional, and educational situations that simulate real life. Observation and reflection are at the core of the learning process. Students observe linguistic phenomena in the material provided and learn to deduct grammar rules from it. The true appropriation of language emanates from the students themselves. This class takes a hands-on and real-life approach to language acquisition.

LFRN-454

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LFRN-353 or required placement test score
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course enables students to acquire advanced oral and written communication skills. The topics presented are representative of French society and the Francophone world, and the communicative tasks are taught within the framework of authentic situations. Students learn to speak, listen, and write in personal, public, professional, and educational situations that simulate real life. Students learn to speak about people and events, to read authentic French texts and more. Observation and reflection are at the core of the learning process. Students will further expand their knowledge of grammar---syntax, verb tenses, etc.---and apply what they have learned in previous courses. Students observe linguistic phenomena in the material provided and learn to deduct grammar rules from it. The true appropriation of language emanates from the students themselves. This class takes a hands-on and real-life approach to language acquisition. Note: This course is not available to students for whom French is one of their primary languages and/or primary languages of instruction.

LHIS-202

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

Nationalism has compelled people to die in the name of national symbols or patrimony, even in an age defined as global or even postnational. What are the causes and sources of nationalism, and why does nationalism continue to be relevant today? In this course, students explore the social history of nationalism, with particular emphasis on the role of music and musicians in nationalist movements. Students examine competing explanations for nationalism, apply these theories to contemporary and historical examples, and reflect on the role of musicians in civil society.

LHIS-203

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course examine the origins of animist, Hindu, and Buddhist thinking. Students also explore early Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and examine the relationship among these monotheistic traditions. Students also will consider Confucian, Taoist, and Greek philosophy (pre-Socratic and Platonic) though the study of primary sources and historical context and the exchange that occurs with cross-cultural contact.

LHIS-215

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: This class is one of several that will satisfy part of the Liberal Arts requirement in history for degree students
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This survey course provides an introduction to the history of East Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries. Paying particular attention to the formation of East Asian modernity, the course will examine how the encounter between East Asia and Western Europe during this period informs current realities. We will look at the role of economic expansion, cultural difference, and scientific discovery in modern East Asian history. The course will cover ethnic nationalism and revolution in China, Japan's emergence as a colonial power, and democratization of Taiwan. Finally we will ask how current East Asian realities may challenge conventional understandings of development.

LHIS-216

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This survey course uses history to illuminate current conflicts in the Middle East. It asks who the people of the Middle East are—including Arabs, Turks, Persians, Jews, Christians, Muslims, Druzes, and Kurds—and how their multiple religious, political, ethnic, gender, and national identities intertwine to create complex and changing relationships with one another and with the rest of the world. We will examine women's roles, the relationship of religion and state, and the spread of militant Islam, all of which present challenges to Middle Eastern societies and to the world today.

LHIS-217

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course examines the history of Europe from the Enlightenment in the 18th century to the end of the Second World War in the middle of the 20th century. It was during these two-and-a-half centuries that traditional European society—rural, agrarian, aristocratic, monarchical—dissolved in a series of political, economic, and social revolutions that led to the formation of the modern world. Students learn about the political and social thought of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the rise of nationalism, the role of women in an age of separate spheres, the growing role of science, the First World War, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism and Communism, the Second World War, and the Holocaust. Students examine the key events in European history which were most responsible for shaping the modern world. Students are also encouraged to consider the degree to which our current society is still a product of the ideas, debates, and controversies generated between 1700 and 1945.

LHIS-219

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department Code: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course explores all aspects of the history of Nazi Germany from Adolf Hitler's rise to power in the early 1930s to his death at the end of the Second World War in 1945. Students examine the Nazi experience from as many vantage points as possible. The class explores the following: the Nazi seizure of power, the Hitler cult, the role of women in Nazi Germany, antisemitism, the Holocaust, Hitler's foreign policy, the appeasement policy of the Western democracies, the Second World War, and daily life in the Third Reich. Because many of the issues touched on in the course have their roots deeper in the German past, the class also spends some time examining the unification of Germany in the late 19th century, the impact on Germany of World War One, and the history of the doomed Weimar Republic (1919-33). The class also watches several films, including a documentary on the Holocaust and the infamous Nazi propaganda film Triumph of the Will.

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