Other

Active Bystander Panel: Hypermasculinity and Music

Tuesday / April 18, 2017 / 8:00 p.m.
Berklee's Valencia Campus
Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia - Anexo SurAvda. Profesor López Piñero 1
Valencia
Spain
46013

Please join SAAVE Valencia (Students Allies in Anti-Violence Education) for a panel and community circle on hyper-masculinity and music. This panel is part of their Sexual Assault Awareness Month events. Panelists are Study Abroad students Nile Seabrooks, Keegan Fitzpatrick and Brian Difrancisco. The panel and community circle will be moderated by Diversity and Inclusion fellow, Jeffrey Cobbold. The event will be held in ensemble room B69 and refreshments will be served afterwards

Public Safety Town Hall

Wednesday / April 26, 2017 / 4:00 p.m.
8 Fenway
8 Fenway - 1st Floor - Houston Hall
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Given the changing public safety environment on our nation’s campuses, Berklee’s Public Safety team undertook a comprehensive review of our public safety model in 2015. During this review, we relied upon the extensive and diverse experience of existing command staff, analysis of relevant data, consideration of local and national recommended best practices, and close collaboration with Berklee’s diverse community, surrounding neighbors, and municipal and campus law enforcement partners. This review produced many recommendations, including:

  • the formation of a professionally trained and experienced community police department
  • the addition of mobile police units to ensure rapid response to any emergency on campus and to assist any students with medical issues
  • the addition of bicycle patrols to enhance patrol effectiveness and further strengthen bonds within our community, and
  • the addition of campus safety liaisons who work hand-in-glove with our community police department to ensure a welcoming environment for the entire Berklee community, while simultaneously ensuring that we provide adequate protection to our community.

We incorporated those changes into our public safety model over the past year, but have not yet addressed one important recommendation from our review. Our review called for arming our community police, as is the case with virtually all of the colleges and universities in the Boston area; this is also a best practice recommendation of the Massachusetts Department of Education. We are now planning to implement this final recommendation and want to give you an opportunity to ask questions and share your feedback about this change.

Our new model has been in place for over a year now and the result is a new, more highly sophisticated and capable department that focuses on proactive, community-based policing designed to achieve our most fundamental objective—ensuring a safe and secure learning environment for all to value and enjoy. The department's core values of integrity, quality, fairness, diversity, partnership, and compassion reflect the finest tradition of policing. To ensure those values prevail in defining the department’s character and contribution, Berklee Public Safety, like all police agencies, relies upon a combination of mentoring, training, and policies intended to guide officers in the performance of their duties and recruitment of skilled personnel. All of Berklee’s officers are appointed only after extensive background investigation and unanimous approval of a diverse hiring committee comprising representatives from various segments of Berklee’s post-merger community. Constructing a police force that reflects Berklee’s diverse population has been and remains a leading priority. In addition, all members of our police department are academy-trained and state-certified; all have been educated in constitutional law, police patrol procedures, diversity and social issues, and use of force and de-escalation principles, among many other topics, and all have prior campus and/or municipal law enforcement experience. Most officers come to the college from agencies that required them to carry a firearm on duty.  

To date, however, Berklee police officers have not been issued nor have they carried firearms on duty. Berklee is one of only a few colleges in the Boston area that is not currently armed. Given the realities of campus policing in 2017, Massachusetts Department of Higher Education and industrywide recommended best practices, and the character, professionalism, training, and experience of Berklee Public Safety officers, the college’s leadership has determined that it is in the best interest of our community that our police officers be armed. This will better enable the department to provide the level of service and protection the Berklee community needs and deserves.  

But regardless of the agency or location, an officer’s firearm is just one tool in a much larger kit intended to enable officers to better meet the great challenge and responsibility of protecting a community. Like all other agencies throughout the country, Public Safety’s most powerful tool continues to be community policing initiatives designed to promote organizational strategies supporting community/law enforcement partnerships and problem-solving techniques without reliance on force. Toward that, Berklee’s officers—who are already very experienced and extensively trained—will receive supplemental training. As part of this commitment to training, Public Safety will

  • Develop a formal continuing training program for our officers, in which all armed department members will receive ongoing training in all areas relevant to the responsibility for carrying firearms on duty—as is the case with any other law enforcement agency—and they will be required to qualify with accuracy and frequency scores exceeding those of even the Massachusetts Municipal Police Training Committee.
  • Provide ongoing training in what it means to be a community police officer, in general and as applied to our community. Berklee is fortunate to have a very diverse community—it’s core to our success—and that has been a very important factor in the development of our training program. We thank our colleagues in Human Resources and Diversity and Inclusion for their assistance in developing specialized training modules to support this effort.

Since we introduced our new public safety model in 2015, we have received very positive feedback about our team and our effectiveness from the Berklee community and from our neighbors. We appreciate the great effort, collaboration, trust, and community that have helped to build our new Public Safety Department, and we look forward to expanding upon this great partnership of shared responsibility for our community’s public safety and quality of life for years to come.  

We have held two town meetings on the Berklee College of Music campus to give the community a chance to hear our plans and ask questions. We will hold two more town meetings on the Boston Conservatory at Berklee campus on:

  • April 21, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. in the Opera Hall at 8 The Fenway, 4th floor.
  • April 26, 2017, at 4:00 p.m. in the Houston Hall at 8 The Fenway, 1st floor.

Please plan to attend one of these meetings if your schedule permits.

  • April 26, 2017 at 4:00pm in the Houston Hall at 8 The Fenway, 1st floor.

Please plan to attend one of these meetings if your schedule permits.

Public Safety Town Hall

Friday / April 21, 2017 / 10:00 a.m.
8 Fenway
Boston
Massachusetts
United States
02474

Given the changing public safety environment on our nation’s campuses, Berklee’s Public Safety team undertook a comprehensive review of our public safety model in 2015. During this review, we relied upon the extensive and diverse experience of existing command staff, analysis of relevant data, consideration of local and national recommended best practices, and close collaboration with Berklee’s diverse community, surrounding neighbors, and municipal and campus law enforcement partners. This review produced many recommendations, including:

  • the formation of a professionally trained and experienced community police department
  • the addition of mobile police units to ensure rapid response to any emergency on campus and to assist any students with medical issues
  • the addition of bicycle patrols to enhance patrol effectiveness and further strengthen bonds within our community, and
  • the addition of campus safety liaisons who work hand-in-glove with our community police department to ensure a welcoming environment for the entire Berklee community, while simultaneously ensuring that we provide adequate protection to our community.

We incorporated those changes into our public safety model over the past year, but have not yet addressed one important recommendation from our review. Our review called for arming our community police, as is the case with virtually all of the colleges and universities in the Boston area; this is also a best practice recommendation of the Massachusetts Department of Education. We are now planning to implement this final recommendation and want to give you an opportunity to ask questions and share your feedback about this change.

Our new model has been in place for over a year now and the result is a new, more highly sophisticated and capable department that focuses on proactive, community-based policing designed to achieve our most fundamental objective—ensuring a safe and secure learning environment for all to value and enjoy. The department's core values of integrity, quality, fairness, diversity, partnership, and compassion reflect the finest tradition of policing. To ensure those values prevail in defining the department’s character and contribution, Berklee Public Safety, like all police agencies, relies upon a combination of mentoring, training, and policies intended to guide officers in the performance of their duties and recruitment of skilled personnel. All of Berklee’s officers are appointed only after extensive background investigation and unanimous approval of a diverse hiring committee comprising representatives from various segments of Berklee’s post-merger community. Constructing a police force that reflects Berklee’s diverse population has been and remains a leading priority. In addition, all members of our police department are academy-trained and state-certified; all have been educated in constitutional law, police patrol procedures, diversity and social issues, and use of force and de-escalation principles, among many other topics, and all have prior campus and/or municipal law enforcement experience. Most officers come to the college from agencies that required them to carry a firearm on duty.  

To date, however, Berklee police officers have not been issued nor have they carried firearms on duty. Berklee is one of only a few colleges in the Boston area that is not currently armed. Given the realities of campus policing in 2017, Massachusetts Department of Higher Education and industrywide recommended best practices, and the character, professionalism, training, and experience of Berklee Public Safety officers, the college’s leadership has determined that it is in the best interest of our community that our police officers be armed. This will better enable the department to provide the level of service and protection the Berklee community needs and deserves.  

But regardless of the agency or location, an officer’s firearm is just one tool in a much larger kit intended to enable officers to better meet the great challenge and responsibility of protecting a community. Like all other agencies throughout the country, Public Safety’s most powerful tool continues to be community policing initiatives designed to promote organizational strategies supporting community/law enforcement partnerships and problem-solving techniques without reliance on force. Toward that, Berklee’s officers—who are already very experienced and extensively trained—will receive supplemental training. As part of this commitment to training, Public Safety will

  • Develop a formal continuing training program for our officers, in which all armed department members will receive ongoing training in all areas relevant to the responsibility for carrying firearms on duty—as is the case with any other law enforcement agency—and they will be required to qualify with accuracy and frequency scores exceeding those of even the Massachusetts Municipal Police Training Committee.
  • Provide ongoing training in what it means to be a community police officer, in general and as applied to our community. Berklee is fortunate to have a very diverse community—it’s core to our success—and that has been a very important factor in the development of our training program. We thank our colleagues in Human Resources and Diversity and Inclusion for their assistance in developing specialized training modules to support this effort.

Since we introduced our new public safety model in 2015, we have received very positive feedback about our team and our effectiveness from the Berklee community and from our neighbors. We appreciate the great effort, collaboration, trust, and community that have helped to build our new Public Safety Department, and we look forward to expanding upon this great partnership of shared responsibility for our community’s public safety and quality of life for years to come.  

We have held two town meetings on the Berklee College of Music campus to give the community a chance to hear our plans and ask questions. We will hold two more town meetings on the Boston Conservatory at Berklee campus on:

  • April 21, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. in the Opera Hall at 8 The Fenway, 4th floor.
  • April 26, 2017, at 4:00 p.m. in the Houston Hall at 8 The Fenway, 1st floor.

Please plan to attend one of these meetings if your schedule permits.

Interview with Composer John Debney via Skype

Friday / April 21, 2017 / 1:00 p.m.
Berklee Media Center
150 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02215
Interview with Composer John Debney via Skype
The Jungle Book, Passion of the Christ, Sin City
presented by the Film Scoring Network
 
John Debney’s career seemed destined for Hollywood, the son of Disney Studios producer Louis Debney, John grew up in nearby Glendale, California where he got early inspiration for film and music growing up on the Disney Studio lot. Debney’s first big film break came in 1997 with an offer to work on Liar Liar with director Tom Shadyac. With the success of this blockbuster comedy under his belt, Debney went on to work on a variety of different major films including Elf, Iron Man 2, Spy Kids (1 & 2), and I Know What You Did Last Summer. Debney and Shadyac continued to collaborate, going on to do Bruce Almightyin 2003 and the spinoff Evan Almighty together. In 2005, Debney formed a successful partnership with director Robert Rodriguez, creating scores for his movies Sin City and Machete.
 
Although Debney was widely known within the industry as a versatile and talented composer, the world wouldn’t discover him until he composed the landmark score for Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ. Enticed by the idea of working on a project that held deep, spiritual meaning for him, Debney’s score, which blended symphonic orchestra, a wide range of world instruments, and the beauty of the human voice, connected on an emotional level with viewers and listeners, and rose to #1 on Billboard’s charts for Soundtrack and Christian Albums, and #19 on the Billboard Top 200. The record was certified gold by the RIAA and won the Dove award for Best Instrumental Album, as well as garnering Debney an Oscar nomination.
 
Debney’s most commercially successful work to date is Disney’s live-action adaptation of The Jungle Book, directed by Jon Favreau, released in 2016. Debney credits the success of the movie to the fact that both the film and the score, “Embraced the history” of the original. Long-time collaborator, Jon Favreau and John Debney have worked on a variety of films together including Elf, Zathura, Iron Man 2, and The Jungle Book.
 
Considered one of the most prolific and successful composers in Hollywood, Debney has won 3 Emmy’s and been nominated for 7. He is also an Academy Award nominee, and the youngest recipient of ASCAP’s prestigious Henry Mancini Lifetime Achievement Award.
Admission: 
Free

Interview with Rich Vreeland ’09 and Akash Thakkar ’12 via Skype

Thursday / April 20, 2017 / 6:00 p.m.
Berklee Media Center
150 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02215
Interview with Rich Vreeland ’09 and Akash Thakkar ’12 via Skype
presented by the Sound Design Network and the Video Game Music Club
 
Join us for an interview with composer Rich Vreeland B.M '09 and sound designer Akash Thakkar B.M. ’12, two Berklee alumni who worked in tandem on the hit indie game Hyper Light Drifter. Developed by Heart Machine, this 2d action role-playing game pays homage to classic 8-bit and 16-bit video games, and is considered by its lead developer Alex Preston to best resemble a combination of The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past and Diablo. Preston originally launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the game’s development for approximately $27,000 but ultimately raised more than $600,000, allowing the hiring of a full team of visual artists and audio specialists.
 
Rich Vreeland
Pulsing, ambient, nostalgic, oozing — these are some of the unique qualities critics have used to describe the film and video game music of Berklee alumnus Rich Vreeland, who is better known by his alias Disasterpeace. He is behind the recent and bold score to the horror film It Follows. He's gained a following from the independent film community, including positive reviews from Filmmaker Magazine, Moviepilot, and Entertainment Weekly. Rich also comes from a video game scoring background, and while he has credits for Runner2: Future Legend of Rhythm Alien and Hyper Light Drifter, he is perhaps best known for the 8-bit ambient soundtrack of FEZ, a popular independent game that was featured in Indie Game: The Movie. Vreeland began his college career in 2006 at Berklee College of Music and graduated in 2009 with a Bachelor’s of Music in Music Synthesis. Eventually, he learned of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Game Lab and took advantage of the internship opportunities there. The work and dedication Vreeland puts into all of his opportunities has led him to the impressive portfolio he has at such a young age.
 
 
Akash Thakkar
Based in Seattle, WA, Akash has extensive experience in the indie game scene as a composer and sound designer, with credits including Hyper Light Drifter, Infinifactory, Ironclad Tactics, Gnomoria, Freedom Planet, City Quest, and more. A graduate of Berklee College of Music, Akash has given talks at dozens of PAX events, MAGFest, PopCap Games, TEDx, and more. He also teaches as a game audio professor at the Seattle Film Institute and is constantly looking for new ways to spread his knowledge within the game industry.
Admission: 
Free

Copyright 101

Wednesday / April 19, 2017 / 7:00 p.m.
Berklee Media Center
150 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02215
Copyright 101
hosted by George Howard, Associate Professor, Music Business/Management
with guest panelists Kyle Thornton, Berklee and Jennifer Marr, Harvard Law School
 
co-sponsored by the Music Law & Mangement Club.
 
Join us for a discussion delving into the basics of copyright. This talk will address several questions. Do I need a copyright? What can I do with my copyright? What are the different types of copyright? Can I collect royalties? What is a PRO? What is the impact of streaming on copyright? Come learn how copyright impacts you as a music professional.
 
George Howard is an associate professor of management at Berklee College of Music. Howard is the COO of Norton, LLC, the parent company of Wolfgang's Vault, Daytrotter, Concert Vault, and Paste Magazine. He has managed Carly Simon, a Grammy- and Oscar-winning singer-songwriter, and advised Mark Isham, a Grammy- and Emmy-winning composer. Howard was an original founder of TuneCore, and was the president of Rykodisc. He has written a number of books on the music industry, including Getting Signed! An Insider's Guide to the Record Industry and Music Publishing 101.
 
Kyle Thornton is a Berklee artist who leads the group Kyle Thornton & The Company. No longer one of Boston’s best-kept secrets, Soul/Hip-Hop collective Kyle Thornton & the Company has performed at festivals such as Lollapalooza, while tens of thousands of people on YouTube have viewed their videos of original and cover songs.
 
Jennifer Marr is a member of the Class of 2018 at Harvard Law School. She is the industry relations chair of the Recording Artists Project, an orginization that aims to provide musicians with free legal counsel.
Admission: 
Free

OMI Members Tech Review

Friday / March 10, 2017 / 10:00 a.m.
195 Chrystie Street
New York
New York
United States
10002
Open Music Background

Members will meet to review and comment on version 1.0 business requirement specifications recommended from the five OMI Working Groups. Additionally use cases for proof of concept implmenetations will be presented. 

All members of OMI are encouraged to join us, and contribute to the discussion. Coffee and lunch will be provided.

Agenda:

9:30 a.m. Registration

10:00 a.m. Agenda and Updates (Panos Panay)

10:05 a.m. Summer Lab 2017 (Michael Hendrix)

10:20 a.m. Minimum Viable Interoperability (MVI) 1.0 Objectives (Dan Harple)

10:40 a.m. Break

10:50 a.m. Company Presentations from MVI 1.0 OMI Member Partners (Dubset, BigchainDB, Round Hill Music)

11:30 a.m. Lunch

12:00 p.m. Toolbox for API Specifications (Gavin Nicol, and Erik Beijnoff - Spotify)

12:50 p.m. Working Groups Breakout Session

2:40 p.m. Working Groups Present Back (Facilitators: Daan Archer and George Howard)

3:45 p.m. Break

4:00 p.m. OMI Member Townhall Discussion (Facilitators: Panos Panay, Dan Harple, Michael Hendrix, George Howard)

4:30 pm Adjourn


 

Please visit open-music.org for more information and FAQs.

Admission: 
OMI Members

Music Tech Meetup: Next Generation

Wednesday / March 15, 2017 / 6:30 p.m.
Workbar
45 Prospect Street
Cambridge
MA
United States
02139

This Music+Tech Meetup will center around connecting the new generation of student techies with industry experts, sparking new relationships and ideas. 

Event Overview: 

6:30 - 6:45: Arrive and snag some hot pizza! 

6:45 - 7:00: Open Pitches lasting 2-3 minutes per person (sign up sheet will be available at the entrance)

7:00 - 7:45:  Brainstorming Activity covering topics such as

1. Live music: How might we reinvent the live music experience with new technologies?

2. Music therapy: How might we heal people using music and technology?

3. Musical instruments: How might technology change the way we create music?

4. How might technology create new ways to experience music?

7:45 - 8:00: Optional Presentations, Keynote from student led startup, EchoMe

8:00 - 9:00: Open Network

This Meetup is co-hosted by The Student Entrepreneurship Association and BerkleeICE.

Admission: 
FREE

Sarangi and Hindustani Music Workshop by Suhail Yusuf Khan

Tuesday / April 18, 2017 / 12:45 p.m.
Room B41, Multipurpose Hall 150 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston, MA 02115, United States
MA
02115

The sarangi, one of the oldest and most popular string instruments in Hindustani (North Indian classical) music, is known to be one of the most demanding string instruments to play. It is also the only instrument in the world that can emulate all the nuances of the human voice. Played with a bow, this instrument has three main strings and 37 sympathetic strings. 

Suhail Yusuf Khan, a sarangi prodigy, started to play the instrument when he was 7 years old. The grandson of the sarangi legend Ustad Sabri Khan, and nephew of sarangi genius Ustad Kamal Sabri, his professional career took off at age 11 when he played his first live concert in Liverpool, England. 

Ever since, Khan has toured extensively in India, across Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and the U.S. Having played with artists like Steve Vai, James Yorkston, and John Thorne, Khan has transcended musical and cultural boundaries as a music composer, instrumentalist and singer. A musician who delves heavily into experimentation, and integrates musical influences from all over the world into his playing, Khan is the first of his kind to fuse ancient classical music from India with genres as varied as jazz, rock, electronic, and Irish music. 

Berklee India Exchange is proud to host Khan as he conducts a master class on Hindustani music and the sarangi. He will also be one of the featured guest artists in the Berklee Indian Ensemble spring concert, Bridges, on May 9.

Admission: 
FREE

Beyond BTOT: Spirituality in the Classroom

Thursday / April 27, 2017 / 1:00 p.m.
The Loft
939 Boylston St.
Boston
MA
United States

The Beyond BTOT series offers our community opportunities to continue conversations that began at our annual faculty development conference and to learn together through collaboration.

 

Spirituality in the Classroom
Presented by John Funkhouser (Professor, Ear Training), Linda Chase (Professor, Liberal Arts) and Jon Hazilla (Professor, Percussion)
 
Does your spiritual practice and belief system affect your teaching? In a pluralistic institution such as Berklee, how do you address and nourish the spiritual growth of your students while respecting differences in religious and cultural backgrounds and spiritual languages? What ways have you found to bring your spiritual practice to life in the classroom? Whether you practice prayer, meditation, yoga, Tai Chi, music, or any other spiritual or mind/body practice, join us for this inclusive roundtable discussion. Share your stories and hear from colleagues about how their spiritual practices and beliefs affect their teaching in positive ways. All are welcome, whether or not you attended the January BTOT session.
 
At January’s BTOT session, we spent most of the session hearing everyone’s personal stories and thoughts about their spiritual practice and philosophy.  At this session, we hope to move more toward discussion of how and to what extent these practices and viewpoints affect our day to day teaching.

 

This event is open to faculty, chairs and deans. Lunch will be provided.

RSVP by Monday, April 24 to reserve your seat. 

Admission: 
Free

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