Concert

The New Gary Burton Quartet

Sunday / September 25, 2011 / 7:30 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115
The New Gary Burton Quartet

Gary Burton's debut release on Mack Avenue Records, Common Ground, is Burton's first studio album since 2005, and introduces his latest band, the New Gary Burton Quartet, featuring guitarist Julian Lage, bassist Scott Colley, and drummer Antonio Sanchez. The group performs during the closing night concert of the 2011 Berklee BeanTown Jazz Festival.

Burton, the Grammy-winning pioneer of the four-mallet vibraphone technique, has been well-known throughout his five-decade career for his quartets (beginning with his 1967 group featuring Larry Coryell, Roy Haynes, and Steve Swallow). "Whenever I start a new group, I often wonder how things will work, to see if the musicians will enjoy playing together and are ready to take the music to a higher level," says Burton. "With the new band, I'm thrilled. It's proving to be one of the standout bands of my career and has already quickly developed its own identity."

Watch a video to learn more about the New Gary Burton Quartet and its new disc.

Listen to the New Gary Burton Quartet on the Sounds of Berklee podcast. 

Admission: 
$35, $25, reserved seating

Rebecca Loebe / Tom Bianchi

Wednesday / October 5, 2011 / 8:00 p.m.
Red Room at Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

In 2010, Rebecca Loebe's full-length album Mystery Prize spent over two months on both the United States and European Americana charts. In the UK, Mystery Prize received a four-star review from Maverick Magazine, whose critic reported, “[the] sophomore album sparkles and bubbles.”

Admission: 
$10 general admission, $8 student

Those Who Can Teach, Perform!

Monday / November 21, 2011 / 1:00 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Each semester, faculty and students of the Music Education Department perform to demonstrate the unique and exciting music-making that goes on in the department.

Admission: 

Autumn Winds

Friday / November 18, 2011 / 1:00 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Lively and lyrical originals and new arrangements performed by the Berklee Flute Choir and the Autumn Wind Ensemble, including flute, clarinet, bassoon, and piano. Directed by professor Wendy Rolfe.

Admission: 

Singers Night

Tuesday / November 15, 2011 / 7:15 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Enjoy a global music experience, featuring a diverse program of multiple styles with emphasis on original compositions, all performed by Berklee's best. This concert is sponsored by the Singers Night Team and the Voice Department. Can't make it to the show? This event will stream live on Concert Window.

Admission: 
$8 in advance (discount applied at checkout), $12 day of show, general admission

Endangered Speeches

Thursday / June 30, 2011 / 12:00 p.m.
Kendall Square
300 Athenaeum Street
Cambridge
MA
United States
Endangered Speeches

Endangered Speeches, the creative brainchild of Greek MC/composer Mariletta Konstrantara, aims to restore a meaningful message and forward direction to hip-hop music. Founded in 2008, Endangered Speeches’s eclectic members hail from around the world, bringing with them their uniquely vast musical experiences. Now, with the release of the debut album, The City is Rough, the band moves determinedly forward, poised to bring the music to the corners of the globe they call "home."

Admission: 
Free

Jazz Composers Alliance Orchestra

Thursday / September 22, 2011 / 8:15 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115

The show features the 19-piece Jazz Composers Alliance Orchestra playing music by faculty member Darrell Katz and JCA composers. Can't make it to the show? This event will stream live on Concert Window.

Admission: 
$8 in advance (discount applied at checkout), $12 day of show, general admission

Randy Weston Concert

Wednesday / September 28, 2011 / 6:30 p.m.
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02116

After six decades of musical direction and genius, Randy Weston remains one of the world's foremost jazz pianists and composers today, a true innovator and visionary. Encompassing the vast rhythmic heritage of Africa, his global musical creations continue to inform and inspire.

"Weston has the biggest sound of any jazz pianist since Ellington and Monk, as well as the richest, most inventive beat," states jazz critic Stanley Crouch, "but his art is more than projection and time: It's the result of a studious and inspired intelligence. . . an intelligence that is creating a fresh synthesis of African elements with jazz technique."

Weston, born in Brooklyn in 1926, didn't have to travel far to hear the early jazz giants who were to influence him. Though he cites Count Basie, Nat King Cole, Art Tatum, and of course Duke Ellington as his other piano heroes, it was Monk who had the greatest impact. "He was the most original I ever heard," Weston remembers. "He played like they must have played in Egypt 5,000 years ago."

His first recording as a leader came in 1954. It was during that decade that he played around New York with Cecil Payne and Kenny Dorham and wrote many of his best-loved tunes. His greatest hit, "Hi-Fly," says Weston (who is 6' 8"), is a "tale of being my height and looking down at the ground."

Weston has never failed to make the connections between African and American music. His dedication is due in large part to his father, Frank Edward Weston, who told his son that he was "an African born in America." Weston says, "He told me I had to learn about myself and about him and about my grandparents. . . and the only way to do it was I'd have to go back to the motherland one day."

In the late '60s, Weston left the country. Instead of moving to Europe like so many of his contemporaries, he went to Africa, traveling throughout the continent and settling in Morocco. One of his most memorable experiences was the 1977 Nigerian festival, which drew artists from 60 cultures. "At the end," Weston says, "we all realized that our music was different but the same, because if you take out the African elements of bossa nova, samba, jazz, blues, you have nothing. . . to me, it's Mother Africa's way of surviving in the new world."

 

 

Admission: 
Free

Terri Lyne Carrington

Tuesday / September 20, 2011 / 7:00 p.m.
Red Room at Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

For more than two decades, drummer, producer, and vocalist Terri Lyne Carrington has crafted an eclectic brand of jazz that incorporates elements of bebop, soul, funk, and much more. Since her debut in 1989, the Grammy-nominated artist has established a reputation for assembling artists of varying styles and perspectives to create music that adheres to the traditions of jazz, yet speaks to a much broader and more diverse audience.

6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.: Meet and Greet

7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.: Evening Show

The show follows an afternoon rehearsal, Q&A, and clinic

 

Admission: 
Free

Berklee P-Funk Ensemble

Saturday / September 24, 2011 / 3:00 p.m.
Natixis Global Asset Management Stage
United States
Berklee P-Funk Ensemble

The Berklee P-Funk Ensemble is a group that honors the music and tradition of George Clinton and Parliament-Funkadelic. It is a Berklee class directed by the funky faculty Lenny Stallworth. This event will feature Bernie Worrell, one of Parliament-Funkadelic's founding members.

Admission: 
Free

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