Concert

Dan HL / yellowbirddd / The Field Effect

Saturday / September 24, 2011 / 8:00 p.m.
Red Room at Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Dan HL

Dan HL is most noted for his crisp, soulful, unique voice, and his ability to write songs that are both honest and singable. He also plays guitar and harmonica, so you can call him a multi-instrumentalist of sorts if, in your opinion, the harmonica is actually counted as an instrument. Throughout his musical career, Dan has shared the stage with many notable artists, with his most recent success as frontman for Dear Havanah, performaing with acts that include Alan Evans of Soulive, and Blackthought of the Roots.

yellowbirddd is the project name for singer/songwriter Liam McCormack. McCormack has been developing his songwriting craft in Boston for the past few years, drawing influences from relationships, city life, and the self-realizations of growing up. With a new full band album set for fall 2011 release, you can certainly expect to see and hear more from yellowbirddd.

Boston indie rock band the Field Effect also performs.

Admission: 
$10, general admission

Ian Axel / Bess Rogers / Allie Moss

Wednesday / September 21, 2011 / 8:00 p.m.
Red Room at Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Alli Moss, Bess Rogers, Ian Axel

On his debut album This Is the New YearIan Axel celebrates relationships, personal transformation, and fresh starts. While examining ties to family, friends, and significant others, Axel has created an album full of playful anthems extolling these human connections and rediscovers that all-important, yet under-considered, link to one's younger self along the way.

Is Bess Rogers a folkie with punk instincts or an indie-rocker with an acoustic bent? Her EP, Bess Rogers Presents Bess Rogers, makes it hard to place her in a neat category—and that turns out to be a source of strength for this eclectic singer-songwriter. Rogers—a member of Ingrid Michaelson's touring band—likes to surround her sweet lyric sentiments with a tough outer coating as she recounts tales of fumbled romance and fragile happiness.

Allie Moss makes sandwiches. She's from Jersey, which means she has curly hair and says the word "yeah" weirdly. She is a word game aficionado and has studied with some of the best 30 Rock scholars in the nation. She also writes songs and tours with Ingrid Michaelson and such.

Admission: 
$12, general admission

Smartbomb / Dead Ellington / The Thickness / Tristan Omand

Saturday / September 17, 2011 / 8:00 p.m.
Red Room at Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Smartbomb

Worcester's own Smartbomb is no stranger to punk rock. Their music is much like their name: an explosion of ideas with thought-provoking lyrics that encourage the listener to question everything. Vocalist/guitarist Eric Widing notes "punk should be more about the approach and not about a cliché regurgitation." Building on influences from a wide range of genres within punk, hardcore, and rock 'n' roll, Smartbomb offers an inspiring blend of progressive thinking and progressive punk rock. Smartbomb come recommended for fans of 7 Seconds, Descendents, and Kid Dynamite.

Dead Ellington is a five-piece punk rock assault hailing from Boston. Their songs are driven by energy from start to finish, filled with heartfelt lyrics, explosive drums, and awe-inspiring guitars. The band itself is composed of five friends who share a common bond—the wish to create good music together and the need to share it with the world. The band released the original Refuse Rethink Rebuild split EP with the now defunct Blue Letter Days in 2006. Now in 2011 Dead Ellington is releasing it's first full-length record also titled Refuse Rethink RebuildRefuse Rethink Rebuild is a new way of thinking. It is about looking at the reality of one's surroundings and creating something new. It is all about refusing the present, rethinking the future, and rebuilding the past. "It's a way of life, not just music, it's our manifesto, embracing the D.I.Y scene from street art to punk rock."

Boston punks the Thickness have been touring the New England circuit for five years and recently released their fifth record, Karaoke Headliner. Filled with aggressive group vocals, '80s metal solos, catchy lyrics, and blasting drums, Karaoke Headliner promises to separate the band from the masses. The Thickness has played with the Voodoo Glow Skulls, Hot Rod Circuit, and New Years Day; toured the U.S. and Canada; and played such festivals as South by Southwest. The band has been categorized as a throwback to punk influencers including NOFX, Bad Religion, and Face to Face. These ingredients are then mixed with a dash of Megadeth and a spritz of Bon Jovi.

Tristan Omand of Manchester, NH is an old soul. A madman with a multitrack recorder. A born entertainer with "a youthful wonderlust, strong passion, and molten ambition." A blazing flat picker. A walking music dictionary. Either way, Omand is a man with a true and honest approach to Americana music. His new album, Tolled Stories, is out now on Raised in a Barn Recordings. He takes influences from Dylan, Cash, Waits, traditional folk, and writers like Bukowski, Kerouac, and Hunter Thompson.

Admission: 
$10/GA

The Aristocrats

Thursday / September 29, 2011 / 7:30 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115

The Aristocrats is a newly formed eclectic rock trio made up of some of the world's greatest musicians. Guthrie Govan, Marco Minnemann, and Bryan Beller promise to put on a show that is not to be missed.

Think you have what it takes to share the stage with the Aristocrats? The band is seeking an opening act for their Berklee Performance Center show. Click here for more information on this exclusive performance opportunity.

Admission: 
$16, $21 reserved seating

The Cello/Piano Project with Eugene Friesen and Tim Ray

Saturday / September 24, 2011 / 2:15 p.m.
Subaru of New England Stage
United States
Eugene Friesen

Musical passion, sweeping melody, and rocking rhythm mark the one-of-a-kind performances of the Cello/Piano Project. Contemporary jazz, Brazilian classics, and American folk tunes are the soil from which the duo's joyful interplay blooms, and chamber music is changed forever.

As featured players with the likes of Paul Winter, Lyle Lovett, Bonnie Raitt, and others, both Eugene Friesen and Tim Ray have cultivated unique styles of accompanying and soloing. At their duo concerts, audiences are treated to the full range of their remarkable abilities in living color.

The melodic and emotional facets of Eugene Friesen's cello have been well documented on hundreds of commercial CDs and film scores. Less known are his unbridled improvisations featuring an almost percussive use of the cello, or his unique pizzicato techniques derived from African folk traditions. Friesen's use of his voice, doubling his cello lines in perfect intonation and nuance, is another distinctive sonic signature.

Ray has appeared on Jay Leno, and has been featured on national tours with Lyle Lovett. Fluent and brilliant in a myriad of American pop, folk, and swing styles, he is also highly regarded as a jazz performer and composer. Though a dazzling soloist, Ray is equally creative as an accompanist and producer and has served as musical director for singer-songwriters Jane Siberry and Victoria Williams on the road and in the recording studio.

Playing jazz as well as innovative compositions by both Friesen and Ray, the Cello/Piano Project traces a wideranging musical gamut in a program which is simultaneously imaginative, immediate, and original.           

Admission: 
Free

Tubby Love

Sunday / September 25, 2011 / 9:00 p.m.
Life is Good Festival
Prowse Farm
Canton
MA
United States
02021
Tubby Love

It's not the size of the man, it's the size of the love. Ranging from acoustic soul to futuristic reggae fusion, Tubby Love is diversely devoted to consciously delivering a message of truth and love. His constant quest for a greater purpose can be easily translated in songs like "Constant Motion" and "The Awakening."

A graduate of Berklee and recipient of the Scott Benson Award, Tubby Love has been blessed to share the stage with many of his influences, such as Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, Passafire, and the Aggrolites, and continues to make a name for himself in the future roots music scene. "I try not to box myself into a genre," he says during an interview at the Salem Jazz and Soul Festival, "What I play is music. I draw inspiration from everything." Outwardly expressing his love for experimental music, Tubby Love is constantly collaborating and combining new flavors, creating what some are calling a "reggae soul revolution." He just calls it music.

Admission: 
TBA

Oleta Adams

Saturday / September 24, 2011 / 5:00 p.m.
Natixis Global Asset Management Stage
United States
Oleta Adams

Oleta Adams has inspired a growing legion of fans in the U.S. and Europe with journeys of the heart via songs that draw deeply from her roots in gospel, while crossing effortlessly into the realms of soul, R&B, urban, and popular music. 

Adams's 1990 debut album Circle of One (which went platinum), and the impassioned hit single "Get Here"—the Brenda Russell composition that became an unofficial anthem of the 1991 Gulf War—built her fan base. Her success, nurtured by worldwide tours with Tears for Fears, Phil Collins, Michael Bolton, and Luther Vandross, has been solidified by four Grammy nominations and a seemingly bottomless well of creative energy.

Admission: 
Free

Bernie Worrell and SociaLybrium

Saturday / September 24, 2011 / 1:45 p.m.
Natixis Global Asset Management Stage
United States
Bernie Worrell

Bernie Worrell first came to prominence as a founding member and musical director of Parliament-Funkadelic. While this massively influential supergroup was radically altering the course of music, Worrell was radically charting the course of emerging keyboard technology during the golden age of analog synthesis. Among the key ingredients in his sonic stew were perfect pitch and a well-honed facility with the classical canon.

A child prodigy who began studying piano at the tender age of 3 and gave his first public performance just a year later, Worrell wrote his first concerto at 8 and performed with the Washington Symphony Orchestra at 10. His classical studies would continue throughout his adolescence, including private lessons at the Juilliard School of Music, before he entered the New England Conservatory of Music. 

Upon leaving the conservatory, Worrell served for several years as musical director for Maxine Brown before joining George Clinton's Parliament-Funkadelic crew. Worrell then proceeded to provide this freewheeling collective with a structural foundation which, while occasionally implied, was ever-present. At the same time, he explored and expanded his own musical ideas in every conceivable direction with a brazenness which was both revolutionary and evolutionary. From fanciful forays on clavinet, which leaped without warning, to guttural gulps to squiggly squeals to liquid Minimoog bass lines, which herded listeners to the dance floor, it all represented new musical language. All the while, his rapid advancements of the synthesizer's potential were actually traceable to his classical foundation.

The hits were many: "Flashlight," "Atomic Dog," "Aqua Boogie," "Cosmic Slop" and "Red Hot Mama" are only a few of the Parliament-Funkadelic classics which Worrell cowrote, played, and coproduced, on dozens of albums—not to mention his years of wild P-Funk performances, which quickly became the stuff of lore.

After departing Parliament/Funkadelic, Worrell resurfaced with the revamped Talking Heads lineup for several albums, including The Name of This Band Is Talking Heads, Speaking in Tongues and Jonathan Demme's dazzling concert film, Stop Making Sense. Worrell's ominous colorings, this time delivered via new digital keyboards such as the Prophet 5, were central to the recasting of group leader David Byrne's musical ideas through African rhythms.

In the years since he left Talking Heads, Worrell has been a phenomenally prolific studio musician, serving as a primary change-agent in the many experimental works of producer Bill Laswell while contributing his singular flair to projects by the likes of Keith Richards, the Pretenders, Jack Bruce, Deee-Lite, and Bootsy's New Rubber Band. At the same time, he has been among the most sampled musicians ever, with Digital Underground, De La Soul, Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg, Ice Cube, DMX, and countless others having acknowledged his timeless grooves by building their tunes around his signature riffs.

Worrell also released a series of critically acclaimed solo efforts, including Funk of Ages, Blacktronic Science, Pieces of WOO/The Other Side and Free Agent: A Spaced Odyssey. And he has become quite a sensation on the jam band circuit, playing with groups ranging from Warren Haynes' Gov't Mule to Laswell's Material, Method of Defiance and Praxis conglomerations.

In 1997, Worrell was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame along with Parliament/Funkadelic (Talking Heads would follow five years later). That same year, he launched his own group, Bernie Worrell and the WOO Warriors, which has performed all over the US and abroad to rave reviews. The in-concert energy of this ensemble has twice been captured on live albums: Bernie Worrell and the WOO Warriors Live (1998) and True DAT (2002).

Worrell's work has also continued to surface in other places. In 1993, when David Letterman moved his program to CBS, Worrell helped launch the CBS Orchestra with Paul Shaffer. He cowrote the score for the cult classic, Car 54, Where Are You? and other films, including the Ice Cube vehicle, Friday. In 2003, his music was featured in the NBC television mini-series, Kingpin.

The "Wizard of WOO" continues to wear many hats as effortlessly as he mixes musical forms, performing with both Mos Def's Black Jack Johnson band and Colonel Claypool's Bucket of Bernie Brains.

2005 saw the release of Stranger: Bernie Worrell on Earth, a documentary film on the life of this master musician. And, between 2009 and 2010, Worrell assembled his latest musical project, SociaLybrium. SociaLybrium is features Worrell on keyboards, Melvin Gibbs on bass, Ronny Drayton on guitar, and JT Lewis on drums—a rock/funk/jazz fusion feast. To finish off 2010 with a bang, Worrell has just recently debuted another collaboration with guitar prodigy Wes Santo called WesN'Worrell.

Admission: 
Free

Music Clubhouse Youth Showcase

Saturday / September 24, 2011 / 12:00 p.m.
Natixis Global Asset Management Stage
United States

Boston's network of neighborhood-based youth music education programs sponsored by Berklee, the Music and Youth Initiative, and eight youth agencies will showcase rising stars from the Blue Hill Boys and Girls Club, Sociedad Latina, Hyde Square Task Force, and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Dorchester.

Admission: 
Free

Danilo Pérez

Saturday / September 24, 2011 / 8:00 p.m.
Scullers Jazz Club
400 Soldiers Field Road
Boston
MA
United States
02134
Danilo Pérez

Grammy Award–winner Danilo Pérez is among the most influential and dynamic musicians of our time. In just over a decade, his distinctive blend of Pan-American jazz (covering the music of the Americas, folkloric and world music) has attracted critical acclaim and loyal audiences. Pérez's abundant talents and joyous enthusiasm make his concerts both memorable and inspiring.

Whether leading his own ensembles or touring with renowned jazz masters (Wayne Shorter, Roy Haynes, Steve Lacy), Pérez is making a decidedly fresh imprint on contemporary music, guided, as always, by his love for jazz. Currently he serves as artistic director of the Panama Jazz Festival, artistic advisor of the innovative Mellon Jazz Up Close series at the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia, and artistic director of the Berklee Global Jazz Institute.

Pérez will be playing two shows, one at 8:00 p.m. and one at 10:00 p.m.

Admission: 
Show, $25; dinner and show, $67

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