Courses

e.g. AR or AR-211
e.g. Film or "Bass Lab"

FS-631

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

This is a project-based course geared toward composers for visual media. Students learn basic aspects of recording, editing and mixing in the modern DAW environment. Students master general concepts of music pre-production, signal flow and signal processing, as well as the specific workflow of Avid Pro Tools and Apple Logic Pro X. Students also learn to achieve professional results and create realistic mock-ups. This course is a prerequisite for FS-632 Recording, Editing, and Mixing Techniques for Film Composers 2. In the two consecutive courses, students learn the complete production process from pre-production, recording though the mixing and delivery stage of music for visual media.

FS-632

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: FS-631 and written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course is a continuation of FS-631 Recording, Editing and Mixing Techniques for Film Composers 1. Students learn more advanced aspects of professional audio editing, mixing different music styles both in stereo and 5.1 surround, mastering, as well as delivery in the modern DAW environment. Students master Melodyne, Elastic audio, Beat Detective, acoustics and advanced mixing techniques with Pro Tools and Logic Pro X. Students create professional-sounding projects within the Pro Tools and Logic DAW environments.

FS-633

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: None; elective course in SFTV
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: FS-533 and written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

Building on skills developed in FS-533, Conducting for Scoring Sessions, this course offers advanced study of the art of conducting as a tool for composers in the recording studio and/or the scoring stage. Students learn complex conducting techniques and gestures to further develop their role as a composer-conductor. In this course, students expand the different ways and forms of communicating with people in different roles, with the goal of increasing success in the recording session, and focusing on effectiveness and efficiency. Students learn different recording methods, such as overdubs, recording by sections, recording full orchestra/ensemble versus family section recording, etc. Students also learn how to develop a wider and deeper listening criteria, by internalizing and acknowledging more complex cues and ways of conducting them, and also developing strategies and techniques to be able to react effectively in real time at the scoring stage or recording studio. Students develop and experience the role of the music producer in a deeper way, buildling on development from their previous recording sessions. Students also learn other content related to the music producer, such as recording locations, budgeting, contracts, planning, and organization.

FS-695

6 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Summer Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

Scoring for film, television, and video games students are required to complete a culminating experience that serves as both a practicum and a bridge to the professional world. The tangible end product of this experience is a master's thesis, which may take the form of an original score, scholarly paper and/or research project, or other enterprise that offers an original solution to the problem of marrying music to visual media, specifically, film, television, and video games. The thesis will be conceived and developed as part of directed study course work, and will be realized in the final seven-week semester. In conjunction with preparation for delivery of the thesis (e.g., final orchestration, preparation of pre-lay elements, final drafting of paper, or execution of business plan), all students undertake a professional internship related to the goals outlined in their thesis proposal. These internships may occur in composer studios, music production and/or supervision companies, post-production houses, entertainment companies, etc. The student works in consultation with his/her faculty advisor and/or the program director to develop his/her unique project and internship plan, the goal of which is a professional outcome. A thesis committee evaluates the final project that results from the culminating experience.

FS-P261

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: MTEC-111 and FS-P114 or FS-221
Department: FILM
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course explores the use of MIDI/audio sequencing in scoring to picture, in conjunction with sample playback and synthesis software. Special attention is paid to the film scoring capabilities of sequencing applications, such as QuickTime, tempo, meter, and synchronization. Emphasis is also placed on maximizing dramatic expression through use of the available software tools.

 

FS-P484

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Alison Plante
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-340, FS-341, and written approval of course chair
Department: FILM
Location: Boston Campus

This is the first semester of a 2-semester course sequence, admission to which is highly limited. Admitted students must take both FS-P484 in fall and FS-485 in spring, and must either have passed or taken COND-361 concurrently in the spring semester. This class will begin the composition of a complete score for a feature length film of the silent era. The final composed score will be performed live with the film in a performance at a local theater in the final weeks of the spring term. The students will each score, arrange, orchestrate and conduct the music for a reel (12-15 minutes) of the film, using thematic material provided by and under the guidance of the instructor.

 

GS-500

0 credit(s)
Course Chair: Camille Colatosti
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: All Berklee College of Music graduate students except for MTHE
Electable by: All Berklee College of Music graduate students except for MTHE
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: GRST
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

Students work closely with their faculty advisor to conceive and develop their culminating experience—a practical, creative, or research project enabling the student to make a contribution to his/her field of study and to develop their academic and career goals. Meetings between the student and advisor begin during the first week of the first semester (or during orientation) and continue until the final week of the program. Students present ideas, receive feedback, advice, support, suggestions, guidance and more from their advisors as they design and execute their culminating experiences and plan their academic and professional careers. Advisors guide students in meeting the various deadlines and milestones required as students complete their culminating experience, prepare for graduation and prepare for their careers.

GS-501

0 credit(s)
Course Chair: Joy Allen
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: MTHE graduate students
Electable by: MTHE graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: GRST
Location: Boston Campus

This course facilitates small group learning communities to explore potential topics of interest in preparation of a student’s culminating experience proposal. Students will be expected to read/share/provide feedback on specific types of projects and related feasibility based on specific areas of interest and clinical environment. This includes an integration of clinical theory, research, and practice around each student’s interest or area of expertise. Templates of various types of projects will be discussed/explored.

GS-502

0 credit(s)
Course Chair: Joy Allen
Semesters Offered: Spring only
Required of: MTHE graduate students
Electable by: MTHE graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: GRST
Location: Boston Campus, Blended (Campus + Online)

Students work with their advising committee members, along with their faculty advisor, to complete their culminating experience—a practical or research project enabling the student to make a contribution to his/her field of study and to develop their academic and career goals. Meetings between the student and the committee member will occur throughout the semester. Students present ideas, receive feedback, advice, support, suggestions, guidance and more from their committee members as they execute their culminating experiences. Committee members guide students in meeting the various deadlines and milestones required as students complete their culminating experience, prepare for graduation and prepare for their careers.

GS-503

1 credit(s)
Course Chair: Camille Colatosti
Semesters Offered: Spring only
Required of: All Berklee College of Music graduate students except for MTHE
Electable by: All Berklee College of Music graduate students except for MTHE
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: GRST
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

Students participate in a diverse array of professional development experiences to facilitate their career success. These experiences may occur throughout the school year as well as during the Professional Development Week at the beginning of spring semester. These experiences assist students in refining their career goals and focus and in developing a career plan. Students also assess their professional skills, remediate gaps, enhance their professional profile, and sharpen their job search skills. More importantly, students strengthen their skills in career exploration and career resilience.

GS-510

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Camille Colatosti
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None; optional elective for CPPD, MPTI, SFTV, and GEMB
Electable by: CPPD, MPTI, SFTV, and GEMB graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: GRAD
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

Principles of Music Research introduces the tools of music scholarship, including reference and research materials in both book and electronic forms. Students develop the skills, attitudes, and understanding to research and write about music by learning how to approach various types of scholarly study within music and by increasing their proficiency with music library resources. Projects and assignments will be tailored to the individual needs of the student working towards his/her culminating experience or thesis project. Students learn advanced information seeking, assembling a literature review, evaluating current research, writing and documenting sources professionally and ethically, distinguishing primary and secondary research, and finding and applying for funding sources. Students taking this course should have the ability to recognize, identify, and define an informational need; seek basic information in a strategic way; locate and access basic information; and evaluate information sources for essential levels of quality and relevance.

GS-515

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Joy Allen
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None; elective course in MTHE
Electable by: MTHE graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: MTHE
Location: Boston Campus

This course explores neuropsychology and neuroscience as it relates to the clinical practice of music therapy. Students learn about the ways human function (e.g. language, memory, movement) is affected by pathologies (e.g. aphasia, dementia, apraxia), as they come to understand how irregularities inform us about regular brain function. Students explore the way functions of the brain engage in various musical elements (rhythm, melody, preferred music). Students also review published case studies as they evaluate both the historical and modern research findings in neuroscience and music. In addition, students distinguish the brains of musicians from non-musicians, analyze how the arts impact neural development, and explore how music perception and production research can be applied to clinical practice.

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