Courses

e.g. AR or AR-211
e.g. Film or "Bass Lab"

FS-P484

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-340, FS-341, and written approval of course chair
Department Code: FILM
Location: Boston Campus

This is the first semester of a 2-semester course sequence, admission to which is highly limited. Admitted students must take both FS-P484 in fall and FS-485 in spring, and must either have passed or taken COND-361 concurrently in the spring semester. This class will begin the composition of a complete score for a feature length film of the silent era. The final composed score will be performed live with the film in a performance at a local theater in the final weeks of the spring term. The students will each score, arrange, orchestrate and conduct the music for a reel (12-15 minutes) of the film, using thematic material provided by and under the guidance of the instructor.

 

GS-500

0 credit(s)
Course Chair: Camille Colatosti
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: CPGJ graduate students
Electable by: CPGJ graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department Code: GRST
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

Students work closely with their faculty advisor to conceive and develop their culminating experience—a practical, creative, or research project enabling the student to make a contribution to his/her field of study and to develop their academic and career goals. Meetings between the student and advisor begin during the first week of the first semester (or during orientation) and continue until the final week of the program. Students present ideas, receive feedback, advice, support, suggestions, guidance and more from their advisors as they design and execute their culminating experiences and plan their academic and professional careers. Advisors guide students in meeting the various deadlines and milestones required as students complete their culminating experience, prepare for graduation and prepare for their careers.

GS-501

0 credit(s)
Course Chair: Suzanne Hanser
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: MTHE graduate students
Electable by: MTHE graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department Code: GRST
Location: Boston Campus

Students work closely with their faculty advisor to conceive and develop their culminating experience—a practical or research project enabling the student to make a contribution to his/her field of study and to develop their academic and career goals. Meetings between the student and advisor begin during the first week of the first semester (or during orientation) and continue until the final week of the program. Students present ideas, receive feedback, advice, support, suggestions, guidance and more from their advisors as they design and execute their culminating experiences and plan their academic and professional careers. Advisors guide students in meeting the various deadlines and milestones required as students complete their culminating experience, prepare for graduation and prepare for their careers.

 

GS-553

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Camille Colatosti
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None; elective course in all graduate programs
Electable by: All graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department Code: GRST
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

In this course, students take an historical and cultural journey through the development of American music culture and artistry, seen through various genre/style windows. These include classical, roots, folk, spirituals, blues, jazz, rock 'n' roll, theater music, global music, soul and social protest, mainstream rock, hip-hop, pop, punk, and modern contemporary. Students explore how American musical artistry is defined as well as the values and beliefs that are at the root of American music and movements. This exploration is enhanced by a study of sociology and ethnomusicology to bring further clarity to the ways music impacts the American cultural experience. Students consider the sociopolitical conditions of American culture and the aesthetic—style, trends, production concerns, and business developments—that have shaped it as they also examine the impact of historical trends on the musical world of today. Additionally, students interpret the artists of the past and today within the context of our own lived conditions.  

 

GS-556

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Camille Colatosti
Semesters Offered: Spring
Required of: All graduate students
Electable by: All graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department Code: GRST
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus, Blended (Campus + Online)

In this course, students compare visual and musical art with a special focus on the essential features of avant-garde art forms and practices. Students explore how these forms and practices have evolved throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and into the twenty-first, analyzing how art forms outside of music inspire musical thinking and creation. Additionally, students discern how visual arts operate according to structural and poetic devices. Interpreting these devices as a sort of language, drawing parallels and comparisons among art forms that appear distinct, students explore the ethical implications of works of art and musical creations. Students also create sonic works that are based on visual art. They explore works of art and key philosophical texts, with the aim of sharpening their ability to see visual ideas in ways that relate to how they hear musical works. Students articulate major sea changes in how art itself has been conceived. They listen to musical compositions that are based on, or modeled after, specific works of art or poetry. In analyzing the many different ways in which musicians have responded to works of visual art in the near and distant past, students make connections among different art forms that exist today, and work toward creating new forms of interdisciplinary art and new ways of conceiving musical sound, structure, form, improvisation, and performance.

GS-595

1 credit(s)
Course Chair: Camille Colatosti
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department Code: GRST
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course provides students an opportunity to integrate professional and academic experience through internships. The internship site must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor and/or the program director and must provide a learning experience that enables the student to meet academic and/or career goals. Through the internship, students apply theories learned in their graduate studies and explore aspects of the music, entertainment, and/or other industry as appropriate.

Please note: Students are responsible for securing their own internships. The internship must be secured prior to course registration. Students must complete approximately 100-300 hours during the internship. International students in F-1 status must obtain authorization on their Form I-20 from their International Student Advisor prior to beginning an internship. 

HR-112

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: All
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: PW-111
Department Code: HARM
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course is a continued exploration of major key harmony, particularly secondary and extended dominant relationships. Additionally, students continue to study melodic construction and motif development. Students learn principles of linear harmonic continuity and guide tone lines; minor key harmony; subdominant minor; blues theory and chord progressions. Students also learn melodic rhythm, form, and melody/harmony relationship.

 

HR-211

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: All
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-112
Department Code: HARM
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

Students continue their analysis and application of major and minor key harmony; elaboration of subdominant minor and modal interchange; and chord scale theory. Students review melodic construction and the melody/harmony relationship. They also review the individual note analysis of melodies. The course introduces substitute dominant and related II-7 chords, diminished chord patterns, and modulation.

 

HR-212

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: All
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-211
Department Code: HARM
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course provides continued study of principles of modern chord progression, particularly deceptive resolutions of secondary dominants, dominant seventh chords without dominant function, and contiguous dominant motion. Students examine melodic construction, form, and melody/harmony relationship; modal interchange; pedal point and ostinato; modal harmony and modal composition; compound chords; and constant structures.

 

HR-231

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-211
Department Code: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

Identification and analysis of rock harmonies and melodies. Examples from the mid-1950s to the present day will be studied. Pentatonic and diatonic harmony, linear/open harmony, modulation, and classic rock chord patterns will be included. Emphasis will be placed on harmonic dictation.

HR-241

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-211
Department Code: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

A study of how harmony interacts with melody, lyric, rhythm, style, and form in Brazilian popular song, accomplished through examining the works of the principal songwriters of three major styles of Brazilian popular music: samba, bossa nova, and MPB (musica popular Brasiliera).

HR-261

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-211
Department Code: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

Songs written and recorded by the Beatles, as well as songs written by the Beatles and recorded by other artists, will be analyzed for their harmonic content, melodic construction, modal focus, rhythmic phrasing, and lyrical construction. The course will be structured around the 10-year rule for composers and the three stages they move through in their career, from being engaged in others' music, to development of the current style, to innovation. In addition, an understanding of each member's personal history will be presented as a means of understanding the group's music. Also addressed will be the social environment from which the group emerged and developed and consideration given to its effect on their musical development and progress.

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