Courses

e.g. AR or AR-211
e.g. Film or "Bass Lab"

LSOC-210

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course introduces cultural anthropology, which is the study of living peoples, their beliefs, practices, values, ideas, technologies, economies, and more. Through a variety of theoretical approaches and research methods, students study the cultures of people across the world. Students examine human diversity and similarity and explore ways that observing real people in their local environment helps us understand humanity.

LSOC-211

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: MUED majors
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course is a survey of the history, theory, and applications of general psychology, including the study of human behavior, factors in psychological development, methods of measurement, and the brain.

 

LSOC-212

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: MTHE majors
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course will examine the psychological, physiological, and sociological foundations of music and music therapy. Students will learn aspects of musical behavior and processing including the influence of music upon behavior, physiological and affective responses to music, perception and cognition of music, psychomotor components of music behavior, learning and development, and preference and creativity.

LSOC-214

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course introduces the study of positive psychology, the scientific study of the strengths that enable individuals and communities to thrive. The major aims of this course are to understand what positive psychology is (how do we define positive psychology) and what the goals of this discipline are. More specifically we will cover positive psychology’s focus on balance and totality (looking at both sickness and wellness, how to both avoid the former and to promote the latter), promotion of positive outcomes (not just curbing negative outcomes) and reliance on scientific evidence (understanding psychological research methodology as well as the physiological, neurobiological and evolutionary underpinnings of topics). We will also touch on the social nature of humans, the communicability of positive stimuli, emotions and moods, and the most important pursuits in life (connecting with others, pursuing meaning, and experiencing some degree of pleasure or satisfaction).

LSOC-219

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course explores the cultural life of homosexuality in America. What might it feel like to be gay or lesbian or queer, as both fantasized by heterosexuality and as lived by gays and lesbians? How is gay life different from straight experience? How do gays, lesbians, and queers understand themselves as gay? What are the aesthetics and sensibilities—losses, fantasies, desires, fears, and joys—which frame and enable gay identity, desire, and enjoyment, in the past, the present, and the future? This course addresses specifically gay, lesbian, queer, transgender, and bisexual selfhood and sociality in order to illuminate homosexual identities, desires, and pleasures. What is gay desire, both in culture, in history? How do homosexuals learn how to desire what they want to have and who they want to be? The purpose of the course is to illuminate the ways in which gayness expresses not simply a sexuality but also a personal lived experience through which queers grasp a sense of themselves and each other. In an historical and cultural examination of theory, philosophy, and literature, this course traces the transformations in gay culture over the latter half of the twentieth century to today. Does gayness have an essence, an identifiable center at its foundation which spans all spaces and times? Or, is queerness a playful masquerade in the negotiation of identity and desire in transient moments in culture and history? This course examines the modes of desire and demand, forms of identification and becoming, and styles of play and amusement through which gays, lesbians, and queers relate to themselves and each other. What does it mean to occupy the mind and the body—thinking, feeling, and being—of a gay individual? What does "gay" mean for straight outsiders and queer insiders? The horizon of the course is to enable us to better understand what we might mean when we say: “I am gay.” Who are we when we are homosexual? And who, "we"?

LSOC-220

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course introduces musical genres, repertoire, composers, and performers that reflect or inspire various gender images and identities in society. Drawing on interdisciplinary discourse, this course provides a variety of sources regarding music and gender in society and facilitates discussion of these topics. Discussion will include otherness, marginalization, and gender identity in music using examples of historic and contemporary musicians as well as musical styles. Students will complete journal entries, essays, peer review editing, and group discussions.

LSOC-223

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

Social Science Topics courses enable students to choose from a variety of course themes that change each semester. Courses may explore a topic or a discipline within the social sciences not currently covered in Liberal Arts courses. Individual course descriptions are available to registering students at www.berklee.edu/liberal-arts.

LSOC-225

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: MBUS majors
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: Passing score on the General Math Exam, LMSC-130, or completion of college level precalculus or higher; and LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus, Valencia (Spain) Campus

An analysis of supply and demand in the international music marketplace, as affecting issues of pricing, employment, the output of goods and services, and competition. Emphasis is also placed on the techniques of financial management found within a music-oriented business, including planning and forecasting, allocation of resources, and profit analysis, as well as the monetary transmission mechanisms found in international business. Note: For MBUS majors, this course can be used to fulfill the social science requirement for degree students.

LSOC-230

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course considers country music's songwriters, performers, and business people and how they reflect or inspire vari ous gender images and identities in society. Drawing on interdisciplinary discourse, students explore a variety of sources regarding country music and gender in society and examine multiple perspectives. Students analyze the relationships among gendered identities, country music, its audiences, and the music industry. Students also synthesize these identities and other cultural factors to express their ideas about gendered identities in country music and in popular society.

LSOC-281

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course is part of Masculinity Studies, a field that emerged from Feminist Studies and Gender Studies. We will explore the social construction of masculinity by considering masculine norms in various contexts. These include race/ethnicity, nationality, socioeconomic class, religion, and sexuality, as well as in our lives. We will consider political and social men's movements, such as socialist men, men's rights advocates, and The Christian Promise Keepers. As we examine the socialization of boys, from early childhood into early adulthood, we will consider how hegemonic masculinity affects males and its subsequent effects on females. 

 

 

LSOC-300

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-223
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

When songwriter/poets portray a city through the blues, they choose gritty lyrics to reflect its tough side. They sing about their own struggle to remember the dream that seduced them to come to live and strive in the city. This course looks at those urban blues that challenge one's everyday existence. Noise, high rent, and crowding are inconvenient. Unemployment, health risks, kids at risk, underemployment, housing shortages, homelessness, and crime are serious problems. These city ills trap many of its residents and yet, an impressively large number survive and thrive because of the city. In this course, you will look at city blues through the lens of sociology and enjoy the music inspired by the city. Assigned readings, group discussion projects, and analytical memos will help you gain a deeper understanding of the complexity of urban problems. The course will highlight today's successful urban community organizations and urban change agents, partnerships, sponsorships, and resources that musician change agents must know about to power through and turn around the city's blues.

LSOC-307

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LSOC-211
Department: LART
Location: Boston Campus

This course presents an overview of major topics in the interdisciplinary study of music cognition. Music processing in the human brain is studied including topics such as learning, memory, attention, categorization, communication, emotion, performance, and expertise. How is music similar to and different from language? How are musical skills acquired? How is emotion conveyed in music and are these cues universal or specific to certain cultures? Research findings will be considered from the perspectives of psychology, neuroscience, and music theory. A theme will be consideration of individual differences between musicians and nonmusicians.

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