Courses

e.g. AR or AR-211
e.g. Film or "Bass Lab"

FS-487

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Alison Plante
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: FILM majors
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-351, FS-403, and FS-441
Department: FILM
Location: Boston Campus, Los Angeles

This course focuses on production of the capstone film scoring projects and graduation portfolio, and provides for individual attention within a small group setting. Career planning, relevant business aspects, and the film and television industry's expectations of the composer/music editor also will be discussed both in the small group meetings with the listed faculty, and in weekly seminars with faculty and visiting artist guest speakers.

FS-489

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Alison Plante
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-351, FS-403, FS-441, and FS-471
Department: FILM
Location: Boston Campus

This course focuses on production of a capstone video game scoring project and graduation portfolio, and provides for individual attention within a small group setting. Career planning, relevant business aspects, and the video game industry's expectations of the composer also will be discussed both in the small group meetings with the listed faculty, and in weekly seminars with faculty and visiting artist guest speakers (this seminar is combined with the FS-487 Senior Portfolio and Seminar in Film Scoring).

FS-495

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Alison Plante
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: Sixth-semester standing and written approval of the course chair
Department: FILM
Location: Boston Campus

Monitored and evaluated professional work experience in an environment related to the film scoring major. Placement is limited to situations available from or approved by the Office of Experiential Learning and the Film Scoring Department chair or designee. To apply for an internship, students must see the internship coordinator in the Office of Experiential Learning prior to registering. Note: Equivalent credit for prior experience is not available due to the requirement of concurrent contract between the employer/supervisor and the college. International students in F-1 status must obtain authorization on their Form I-20 from the Counseling and Advising Center prior to beginning an internship.

FS-510

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

In this course, students explore the conceptual and collaborative processes that result in the successful creation of music for visual media. Scoring for film, television, and video games is essentially musical storytelling, and the composer cannot hope to do this without the tools for narrative analysis. Through in-depth examination of script, style, finished scenes, and exemplary scores, students learn methodically the steps that successful composers take in preparation for scoring, as well as strategies for getting past the first blank page. The ability to conceive the shape of the score before a single note is written is critical, and this begins in: collaboration with the filmmaking team; analyzing dramatic intent; spotting the film for music; determining the function of music; developing a music concept that supports directorial intent; and determining the elements of the music itself, including style, instrumentation, and genre. Students will analyze entire projects and explore a diverse range of eras, genres, dramatic ideas, musical vocabularies, forms, styles, and orchestrations.

FS-520

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

In this course, students become familiar with the musical requirements and expectations of a wide range of cinematic categories and forms, from classic genre film to episodic television comedy and drama to documentary and opinion/propaganda pieces. The conventions of genre are now an established part of every composer's vocabulary. They can be violated, subverted, or updated, but they must first be mastered. Areas of study include the following: comedy, both feature and episodic, including comedic montage and timing; classic drama, including death of principal character, abandonment, and triumph; action and suspense, including the chase, natural catastrophe, cloak and dagger, and sports; period drama, including devices to establish time and place; romance, including development of the romantic theme and technique for leading to the moment of the kiss; science fiction, fantasy, alien worlds, alternate realities, supernatural events; horror, stalking, assault and murder; reality TV, including the use of sound design and synthetic nonmelodic patterns; and classic TV and feature-length documentary, as well as persuasive or propagandistic. As a focused continuation of Advanced Scoring 1, students will further strengthen skills in scene analysis, character reading, psychological persuasion and enchantment (esp. with respect to lowering the threshold of belief in sci-fi and fantasy). Genre scoring also allows composers to explore more deeply their own emotional and psychological processes in order to produce scores that support content in all varieties of visual media, including interactive experiences. Taken in tandem with FS-531, Directed Study 2, as the second phase of a theory and practice sequence.

FS-530

1 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

An advanced practicum that provides individual students with personal mentoring and introduces them to the one-to-one filmmaker-composer collaborative model. With active support and critical appraisal from senior faculty, the student is challenged to conceptualize and execute a plan for scoring a personal slate of short projects, narrative and non-narrative, linear and non-linear, that link to and address critical aspects of his or her overall thesis plan. Drawing on both previously acquired music skills and scoring techniques learned in the co-requisite Advanced Scoring 1: Narrative Analysis, students will demonstrate the ability to convey creative intentions, respond to critical direction, and work intensively to meet deadlines set in tandem with their faculty advisor. The end goal is clearer definition of the thesis objective. Scoring assignments may be drawn from linear and non-linear visual content either submitted by the student or selected by faculty in collaboration with the student, utilizing electronic scoring techniques and/or live-player scoring sessions with students functioning as composer/conductor, or composer/producer.

FS-531

1 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

The second semester continuation of the advanced practicum course that provides students individual supervision in scoring a range of visual media with attention to aesthetic, dramatic, and technical considerations. Taken in tandem with FS-520 Advanced Scoring 2: Genre and Form, projects will focus on genre and type-specific applications of visual scoring craft. Drawing on a full range of previously acquired music skills and scoring techniques, students will convey their creative intentions, respond to critical direction, and work intensively to meet periodic deadlines. Scoring assignments will be drawn from a balanced representation of linear and nonlinear visual content, utilizing electronic scoring techniques and/or real-time, live-player studio sessions with the students functioning as either composer/conductor or composer/producer.

FS-532

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

The third semester continuation of the advanced practicum course that provides students individual supervision in scoring a range of visual media with attention to aesthetic, dramatic, and technical considerations. Projects will expound upon genre and type-specific applications of visual scoring craft. Drawing on a full range of previously acquired music skills and scoring techniques, students will convey their creative intentions, respond to critical direction, and work intensively to meet periodic deadlines. Scoring assignments will be drawn from a balanced representation of linear and nonlinear visual content, utilizing electronic scoring techniques and/or real-time, live-player studio sessions with the students functioning as either composer/conductor or composer/producer.

FS-533

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course offers a study of the art of conducting as a tool for composers in the recording studio and/or the scoring stage. Students analyze the differences between conducting for the concert stage and for the scoring stage, and focus primarily on the latter. Students learn basic conducting techniques, tools, skills, and abilities in order to develop their role as a composer-conductor at recording sessions either with their music or with others’ music. Students learn different techniques of synchronizing and conducting music to picture, such as click track, punches and streamers, stopwatch, and free timing. Students also learn ways and forms of communicating with people in various roles at the studio, such as musicians, recording engineers, score readers, and more, focusing on effectiveness and efficiency. Students also explore the importance of listening and the process of internalizing the music and gestural communication prior to the recording session. Students master strategies and techniques to be able to react quickly and effectively for indications, changes and problem fixes while working on the scoring stage. Based on practical examples, students also come to understand and experience the role of the music producer, and develop themselves through experience in this role in a variety of recording sessions at Berklee.

FS-540

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

In this course, students explore business and entrepreneurial skills for the media composer, with special focus on business aspects that composers will encounter when joining the professional industry. Students learn business development strategies including sales generation, networking, cold calling, reels, websites, upselling, and utilization of social networks. Students also learn many aspects of running a business, including accounting, taxation and finance, employee management, insurance, retirement, and benefit planning. Students learn the fundamentals of establishing a business. They discuss business models including corporations, sole proprietorship, and partnerships. Students will also learn about contracts and agreements, scheduling, and management of deadlines. In addition, students explore business and life management, professionalism, and building of social skills. Students will complete business simulations. They will bid against one another. They will deliver oral presentations and prepare business plans. Throughout the course, students will focus on self-evaluation, and learn about personal presentation, reliability, and ethical business practices.

FS-615

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course offers an intensive study of applied approaches to scoring for video games. An awareness of the deep and rich history surrounding music in interactive arts will be gained through analysis and discussion of example scores and projects. Students work extensively with the application of technology across multiple genres to compose and apply fundamental video game compositional methods to various projects. Students will write simple to moderate-level interactive scores, employing the most commonly used methods in the industry. In addition, students will discuss and learn about specific business issues that include an overview of the video game and interactive industries including contracts, licensing, toolsets, and job opportunities. The course begins to prepare students for entry-level work at a game development company or as a freelance game music professional, including experience with typical game music workflow, and approaches to scoring video games. This course is a foundation for the Advanced Video Game Scoring course, which involves the creation of more advanced and complex interactive scores with direct application of middleware technologies.

FS-616

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: SFTV
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

This is a technology course based on learning the use of MIDI sequencing in scoring to picture, in conjunction to sample playback and composer tech set ups. In this course, students learn how to sequence, work with sample libraries, and use QuickTime, as well as tempo, meter, and synchronization on Digital Performer. Emphasis will also placed on orchestral mockups, sample libraries, and different technological tricks for an optimized use of the DAW when scoring (combined with the use of Vienna Ensemble Pro). 

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