Courses

e.g. AR or AR-211
e.g. Film or "Bass Lab"

HR-261

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-211
Department: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

Songs written and recorded by the Beatles, as well as songs written by the Beatles and recorded by other artists, will be analyzed for their harmonic content, melodic construction, modal focus, rhythmic phrasing, and lyrical construction. The course will be structured around the 10-year rule for composers and the three stages they move through in their career, from being engaged in others' music, to development of the current style, to innovation. In addition, an understanding of each member's personal history will be presented as a means of understanding the group's music. Also addressed will be the social environment from which the group emerged and developed and consideration given to its effect on their musical development and progress.

HR-325

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: JCMP majors
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-212
Department: HARM
Location: Boston Campus, Inside Berklee Courses (Online)

Functional, extended, and bass line reharmonization. Incomplete chord structures and reharmonization of diminished chords. Application of the above techniques for writing turnarounds, introductions, interludes, modulations, and extended endings. Corrections of faulty lead sheets.

HR-335

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-212
Department: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

Emphasis on newer harmonic concepts to enable students to write and analyze tunes in the style of Mike Gibbs, Chick Corea, and others. Discussion and use of nonfunctional harmonic techniques including multitonic systems, constant cycles, and patterned material. Analysis of representative tunes.

HR-345

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-212
Department: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

Modal chord progression and melody using traditional, synthetic, and other modes. Analysis of modal jazz compositions. Modal voicings using characteristic tones and spacing considerations. Use of polytonal and polymodal relationships in original compositions.

HR-351

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-212
Department: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

This course will give a musical view of the solo careers of each member of the Beatles. As a group, their influence in the field of popular music is unparalleled. As separate artists, the unique musical qualities that helped to create the Beatles remains present in their solo work. The cross-pollination between all of them is obvious. This course will examine how each musician transitioned into and developed an individual musical path. It will help provide a deeper look at the Beatles' influence on these four musicians as well as uncover the stylistic similarities and differences between them. As the focus will be on harmonic and melodic content, students will be able to expand their musical vocabulary and understanding. Song form, arranging techniques, and lyric writing will also be addressed, giving a view of harmony and melody in a wider context. Examining each member's personal experiences and social environment will add depth and help students create a stronger connection between musical product and context.

HR-355

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-212
Department: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

A study of the music of this popular jazz fusion ensemble. Students will analyze original manuscripts and transcribed scores to discover the variety of harmonic, melodic, and rhythmic concepts used that make the music unique, and will write tunes that demonstrate their understanding of these elements. Selected compositions will be performed by the Yellowjackets Ensemble, ENFF-325.

HR-361

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-212
Department: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

An introduction to the musical elements of several non-Western musical systems will provide alternative approaches to contemporary composition and improvisation. Topics explored will include melody, mode, improvisation, form, rhythmic organization, and preferences of timbre in the music of India, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America, and Japan. Contemporary world beat styles from these regions will be discussed in relation to underlying traditional genres.

HR-511

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Casey Driessen (Valencia), Marco Pignataro (Boston)
Semesters Offered: Spring, Summer
Required of: None; elective course in all graduate programs
Electable by: All graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department: HARM
Location: Valencia (Spain) Campus

This course is a study of the pervasive harmonic language and techniques of popular American song. The goal of this course is to foster an understanding of the harmonic ideas that have carried American music through the latter half of the last century, and to discover harmonic alternatives to the traditional tonal systems that pervade American popular music of this time. Students come to understand the contextual relationship between melody and harmony through observation of different song forms from different styles of popular music, including show tunes, jazz standards, blues, rock/pop/R&B, and through-composed works in the jazz idiom. Harmonic options, both diatonic and otherwise, will be observed through study of the scale(s) that relate to the chord/tonality of the moment.

HR-P365

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Russell Jr.
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: HR-211 and ET-112
Department: HARM
Location: Boston Campus

The Music of Stevie Wonder is a harmony-driven course that builds on the Berklee core music curriculum foundation by examining the evolution of Wonder's music at a granular level. Topics covered include Wonder's harmonic language, melodic principles and use of melisma, lyrical approaches, and the ways in which these elements support the narrative structure of his compositions. Additional topics considered include recording and production techniques, use of technology, business-related issues, and biographical details.

ICE-P425

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Don Gorder
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: Written approval of course instructor
Department: MBUS
Location: Boston Campus

Have an idea for a business, product or service that you are serious, determined, and ready to launch now? Startup Lab is an intensive course in product or service design, development, and launching, which culminates with an end-of semester fair/exhibition to real-life customers, financial backers, and other business prospects. The class will be conducted at the coworking facility Workbar in Cambridge. Students taking the course will have the chance to use the facilities of Workbar every day after 6 p.m. and throughout the weekend in order to have a dedicated space to think through, develop, and experiment with their concepts—as well as be immersed in the real-life startups and entrepreneurs housed at the space.

Startup Lab is not about business plan writing—students will be challenged to imagine, prototype, test, iterate, build, price, market and launch a marketable product or service in under 15 weeks. There is no limit to what is considered a product or service: software startups, musical equipment products, publishing companies, or musical groups are all viable ideas for the Startup Lab.

This demanding, results-oriented class is open to students in all Berklee majors, and the diversity of projects and students in the class will offer the opportunity for cross-discipline collaboration, discussion, and learning with an emphasis on product/service design, go-to-market planning, continuous iteration, and customer testing that will challenge students’ creative and analytical minds.

Students taking the course will have the chance to interact with and learn from real-world entrepreneurs and visiting instructors from other universities such as MIT. This course is about the intense process of launching a product or service with each group being treated as a real, results-driven startup with real stakes and real pressures. This course is challenging and very demanding and therefore admission to the class will require both an online assessment and instructor interview.

ICE-P435

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Don Gorder
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: Written approval of course instructor
Department: MBUS
Location: Boston Campus

This course examines the ways that technology is disrupting the fields of health and music, and also explores how technology can be harnessed to accelerate discovery and development of new healthcare tools and applications. Students research and collaborate to build new technological applications involving music to improve health, especially in the areas of sleep, stress, and athletic performance. Students also assess the research landscape to identify open questions, as they learn from Berklee and MIT faculty and invited guest scholars about the science of sleep, stress, and music analysis. Students work in interdisciplinary teams with guidance from Sync, a leading, local startup in the music, health and technology industry, to gain hands-on experience with the set-up and execution of small scale research studies. Studies examine the effects of music, and facilitate the ideation of new product concepts in support of clinical and health applications of music.

ICE-P455

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: Don Gorder
Semesters Offered: Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: Written approval of course instructor
Department: MBUS
Location: Boston Campus

This course will be offered as a way for students to work with technology companies to explore the impact of new tech platforms such as a tablet computers on the future of music consumption; as well as the impact of music on the adoption of new technologies. This course teaches the process and methods for product design and development. The foundation is a sponsored project in which teams of students conceive, design, and prototype a physical product. The class is primarily intended for Berklee music business majors (particularly on the entrepreneurship and innovation track) and for students interested learning more about the product design process. The course is jointly taught with Berklee faculty and the Isabella, Inc. leadership team. 

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