Liberal Arts Courses

Nations and Nationalism

LHIS-202

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

Nationalism has compelled people to die in the name of national symbols or patrimony, even in an age defined as global or even postnational. What are the causes and sources of nationalism, and why does nationalism continue to be relevant today? In this course, students explore the social history of nationalism, with particular emphasis on the role of music and musicians in nationalist movements. Students examine competing explanations for nationalism, apply these theories to contemporary and historical examples, and reflect on the role of musicians in civil society.

Ancient Religions and Philosophies

LHIS-203

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course examine the origins of animist, Hindu, and Buddhist thinking. Students also explore early Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam and examine the relationship among these monotheistic traditions. Students also will consider Confucian, Taoist, and Greek philosophy (pre-Socratic and Platonic) though the study of primary sources and historical context and the exchange that occurs with cross-cultural contact.

Early History of the Americas

LHIS-213

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: This class is one of several that will satisfy part of the Liberal Arts requirement in history for degree students
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This survey course in the comparative history of North and South America begins with pre-Columbian civilization and examines the relationship between Amerindian, African, and European cultures during the colonization of the New World. Why did the Spanish and British empires create different economic worlds in the Americas? How did Native American cultures resist and influence the development of European political and legal systems? Course topics include the development of New York as a financial powerhouse under the Dutch, the emergence of a French empire in North America, Spanish expansion into North America, and the comparative histories of slavery in Brazil, the Caribbean, and the United States. Finally, the course examines the American Revolution, the intellectual foundations of Latin American independence movements, and the global impact of economic and cultural change in the Americas.

Modern History of the Americas

LHIS-214

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: This class is one of several that will satisfy part of the Liberal Arts requirement in history for degree students
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This survey course in the comparative history of modern North and South America focuses on constitutional and cultural nationalisms in a hemisphere of increasing immigration and diversity. Topics include revolutionary movements in the Americas from Mexican independence and the American Civil War to 20th-century Latin American political organizations and utopian separatist movements in Canada and the United States. The course examines the comparative histories of frontiers, both natural and cultural, in North and South America, and the emergence of the United States as the dominant economic and political power in the hemisphere.

History of Modern East Asia

LHIS-215

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: This class is one of several that will satisfy part of the Liberal Arts requirement in history for degree students
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This survey course provides an introduction to the history of East Asia during the 19th and 20th centuries. Paying particular attention to the formation of East Asian modernity, the course will examine how the encounter between East Asia and Western Europe during this period informs current realities. We will look at the role of economic expansion, cultural difference, and scientific discovery in modern East Asian history. The course will cover ethnic nationalism and revolution in China, Japan's emergence as a colonial power, and democratization of Taiwan. Finally we will ask how current East Asian realities may challenge conventional understandings of development.

History of the Middle East

LHIS-216

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This survey course uses history to illuminate current conflicts in the Middle East. It asks who the people of the Middle East are—including Arabs, Turks, Persians, Jews, Christians, Muslims, Druzes, and Kurds—and how their multiple religious, political, ethnic, gender, and national identities intertwine to create complex and changing relationships with one another and with the rest of the world. We will examine women's roles, the relationship of religion and state, and the spread of militant Islam, all of which present challenges to Middle Eastern societies and to the world today.

The Modern Age: Europe 1700–1945

LHIS-217

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course examines the history of Europe from the Enlightenment in the 18th century to the end of the Second World War in the middle of the 20th century. It was during these two-and-a-half centuries that traditional European society—rural, agrarian, aristocratic, monarchical—dissolved in a series of political, economic, and social revolutions that led to the formation of the modern world. Students learn about the political and social thought of the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the rise of nationalism, the role of women in an age of separate spheres, the growing role of science, the First World War, the Russian Revolution, the rise of Fascism and Communism, the Second World War, and the Holocaust. Students examine the key events in European history which were most responsible for shaping the modern world. Students are also encouraged to consider the degree to which our current society is still a product of the ideas, debates, and controversies generated between 1700 and 1945.

Women and Culture in the West: Route to Modern Feminism

LHIS-218

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course explores the historical objectification of women and the process by which women in Western culture have sought to gain control of their identities and their lives. The study requires a pluralistic approach to accommodate contesting views. We will examine how women's options and perspectives were framed by major historical and cultural developments and how women in turn impacted key debates. The course will begin looking at women in the European Witch Craze, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. It will chronicle the suffrage struggle, women's involvement in the workplace, and the options offered by Socialism and Fascism. Finally, it will examine the Women's Liberation Movement, women's reproductive rights issues, and women in the modern media.

History of Nazi Germany

LHIS-219

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course explores all aspects of the history of Nazi Germany from Adolf Hitler's rise to power in the early 1930s to his death at the end of the Second World War in 1945. Students examine the Nazi experience from as many vantage points as possible. The class explores the following: the Nazi seizure of power, the Hitler cult, the role of women in Nazi Germany, antisemitism, the Holocaust, Hitler's foreign policy, the appeasement policy of the Western democracies, the Second World War, and daily life in the Third Reich. Because many of the issues touched on in the course have their roots deeper in the German past, the class also spends some time examining the unification of Germany in the late 19th century, the impact on Germany of World War One, and the history of the doomed Weimar Republic (1919-33). The class also watches several films, including a documentary on the Holocaust and the infamous Nazi propaganda film Triumph of the Will.

Cinema in Hitler's Germany

LHIS-220

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course explores the history of German cinema between 1919 and 1945. In the first half of the semester we will be examining the films produced in the era of the Weimar Republic, that decade and a half following the First World War in which democracy failed to take permanent root in Germany. Although associated with political failure, the Weimar years were a time of artistic experimentation, and the films of the 1920s and early 1930s reflect the social, political, and cultural tensions of the period. In the second half of the course we will turn our attention to the cinema created in Germany during the Nazi dictatorship. In Hitler's Germany movies were no longer simply entertainment; they also served as an important form of propaganda: glorifying the regime, creating a sense of national (and racial) unity, demonizing Germany's Jewish minority, and justifying an aggressive foreign policy of war and expansion. In the course of the semester we will be looking at horror films, thrillers, science fiction fantasies, dramas, musicals, love stories, documentaries, and action pictures. And all of them—even those intended as light entertainment at the time—convey historical lessons about how an open and democratic society could disintegrate and be overtaken by a ruthless and genocidal dictatorship.

World Revolutions

LHIS-221

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

Revolution reveals politics and society at the moment of upheaval and transformation. Students examine a number of revolutions worldwide including the French, Russian, and Chinese as well as the more recent Cuban and Iranian revolutions. Study will encompass both origins and outcomes and explore theories of revolution as a means to identify patterns and assign meaning.

History Topics

LHIS-223

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

History Topics courses enable students to choose from a variety of course themes that change each semester. Topics focus on a variety of historical periods and ideas. In History Topics courses, students explore the role of historical sources in the formation of ideas, as they examine various historical interpretations, debates, and methodologies. Students come to recognize that not all questions have simple yes-or-no, right-or-wrong answers. Students learn to appreciate and respect diversity and are able to identify bias in written and media sources used to document history. Individual course descriptions are available to registering students at http://www.berklee.edu/liberal-arts/courses/liberal-arts-topics-courses.

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