We Avalanche and The Dwells

Thursday / July 18, 2013 / 6:00 pm
Institute of Contemporary Art
Putnam Investment Plaza, 100 Northern Avenue
Boston
MA
02210
The Dwells
We Avalanche
Photo by Henry Diltz

Heavily influenced by noise, pop, and old-time, We Avalanche sounds like your favorite band that forgot how to play their instruments. The Dwells are cosmic Americana, born on the Fourth of July. Together, Paige Califano and Matthew Bean are a vocal swirl, drenched in memorable lyrics and infectious songwriting.

Few great ideas have ever arrived through apprehension. We Avalanche knows this, applies this, and shares this with their audience. They are explorers. Brady Custis found Zach Baldwin-Way in the ruins of ancient Greece and soon after found Eric Law through passing nods on a train to anywhere. Their specific brand of folk music is representative of this undying desire to explore the unexplored, attempting to preserve this historic art form while pursuing progress as well.

Often characterized by the unique blend of their instruments (voice, guitar, cello, and mandolin), We Avalanche's sound is uncommon. The band cites folk legends like Hank Williams, Paul Simon, and Pete Seeger as influences, but both modern pop and counterculture subgenres have a recognizable impact on their music. Often drawing comparisons to recent acts such as Elliott Smith, Sonic Youth, and Joanna Newsom, We Avalanche puts new spins on a dearly respected tradition, resulting in either a flutter of strings pulling rhyme into motion or a cacophonous rumble, as free as it is inspired.

We Avalanche recorded their debut album, Time Travels, in Nashville, Tennessee, and released it in 2012 in their hometown of Boston.

The Dwells were born on the Fourth of July. Paige Califano and Matthew Bean were enjoying the night on a hot, crowded Boston rooftop, but soon found themselves one floor below with some old notebooks and a guitar. Their voices blended minutes into hours, and as morning glazed the window, they both left hearing music come to life like they had never heard before.
 
As they dove into new ideas, they slowly crafted their sound, and what emerged was a neo-Americana, cosmic folk duo that gave a nod to earlier genre-benders like Gram Parsons and Elliott Smith. They pull inspiration from drama and expression in all mediums. They released their debut record, Fortieth Floor, last May and will be releasing their second album, Don't Ever Leave Me Like You Do, with a full band this March. (Did we mention it'll be on vinyl?) The Dwells are warmly settling into the Boston music scene, huddled around their single mic, one show at a time.

Admission: 
Free