Guy Van Duser / Bobby Stanton Clinic

Tuesday / July 8, 2014 / 12:00 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
02115
Guy Van Duser

Acclaimed guitarists Guy Van Duser and Bobby Stanton present a clinic for Berklee Guitar Sessions students.

Recording artist Guy Van Duser is internationally known for his unique, imaginative, and sometimes outrageous arrangements for fingerstyle guitar, including the amazing "Stars and Stripes Forever," acknowledged by guitarists worldwide, including Chet Atkins, as setting the bar for fingerstyle arrangements. Van Duser has 13 albums available from Rounder Records, Daring Records, and Green Linnet Records, and is a composer for films and public television programs (including the Antiques Roadshow theme song). Of particular note is his development of what he terms his "stride guitar" technique, a fusion of the fingerpicking virtuosity of Chet Atkins and the swing and stride piano styles of Fats Waller, Teddy Wilson, and other jazz pianists of the 1930s. By simultaneously playing bass lines, chords, and melody, he has elevated the swing-style guitar from its traditional rhythmic accompaniment role, and has influenced a new generation of guitarists. Van Duser has often been featured on Garrison Keillor's A Prairie Home Companion as well as All Things Considered on NPR.

Bobby Stanton moved to Nashville early in his career and played with several different artists. After studying with guitarist Lenny Breau, he decided to move to Boston to attend Berklee. He graduated with honors and received the Ovation Award from William Leavitt and Gary Burton. He taught at Berklee for several years and continued to play and record with a wide variety of artists. Stanton has contributed articles to international music publications such as Guitar Player magazine. As a songwriter, he has won awards from BMI and ASCAP. He also won seven Boston Music Awards and has extensive experience in recording and playing for theater, radio, and television. He is currently teaching at McNally Smith College in St. Paul, Minnesota.

Admission: 
Free