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Spirituals Presented by Voice Professor Gabrielle Goodman

Friday / June 25, 2010 / 3:00 pm
Berk Recital Hall
1140 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02215

'Spirituals' presented by Voice Professor Gabrielle Goodman as part of the Vocal Summit program.

Admission: 

Five-Week Summer Performance Program: Tuesday-Night Jams

Tuesday / July 20, 2010 / 7:00 pm
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Faculty members Bob Schlink and Bain Smith lead the weekly jam session for Berklee's Five-Week Summer Performance Program students.

Admission: 

Five-Week Summer Performance Program: Tuesday-Night Jams

Tuesday / July 13, 2010 / 7:00 pm
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Faculty members Bob Schlink and Bain Smith lead the weekly jam session for Berklee's Five-Week Summer Performance Program students.

Admission: 

Dance Marathon: Keeping the HeartB.E.A.T.

Sunday / April 18, 2010 / 4:00 pm
House of Blues
15 Lansdowne St.
Boston
MA
United States
02215

Keeping the HeartB.E.A.T. is an eight-hour dance marathon to benefit the Jimmy Fund, raising money to fight pediatric cancer at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Organized by the Berklee Entrepreneur Action Team and Boston college students, the event will feature performances by Kid:Nap:Kin, Endway, Dirty Dishes, McAlister Drive, Dopapod, KR and the Future, and Agari Crew. The Michael Jackson Tribute Band will headline the event.

There will also be dance teams and DJs performing throughout the night. Visit the event website for more information.

Admission: 
$10

Presentation in Tribute to Howard Zinn

Friday / October 1, 2010 / 4:00 pm
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

A panel presentation in tribute to Howard Zinn, as part of a session of the New England American Studies Association Conference in Boston, October 1–2.

Admission: 

Music for Film Networking Event

Saturday / April 10, 2010 / 1:30 pm
Berklee Media Lab
150 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02215

Berklee's fifth annual Music for Film Networking Event
on Saturday, April 10 will take place from 1:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Registration is from 1:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Preregister online through Thursday, April 8. For more information go to learningcenter.berklee.edu.

 

Presentations

2:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Man or Mouse?: The Modern Conundrum

The value of the human factor in film music, at any budget.

Presented by Mason Daring

 

3:30 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.


Legal Resources for Composers and Filmmakers

Presented by Valerie Lovely.

 

4:30 p.m. to 5:15 p.m

Film Scoring Contest Showcase and Awards Ceremony

See the results from Berklee's Film Scoring Contest 6 and meet the winning composers, as well as see a premier of the finalists' scores to Wham, directed by Chris Martin of NYU Tisch School for the Arts Asia.

 

5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.

Music for Film Expo


Meet Berklee College of Music composers, sound designers and audio engineers, and hear/view their demos. Check program for student bios and expo booth locations.

Admission: 
Free and open to the public

Pitch Slapped in A Cappella Finals

Saturday / April 24, 2010 / 8:00 pm
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
10 Lincoln Center Plaza
New York
NY
United States
10023-7035

Berklee's own award winning a cappella group, Pitch Slapped, will compete in the Varsity Vocals International Championship of A Cappella.  

Pitch Slapped is the one and only coed a cappella group from Berklee. Founded in 2006 by Cate Wright and Mary Dooley, Pitch Slapped has spent the past three years performing in and around the Boston area, creating a distinguished reputation. Their repertoire consists of a variety of music, ranging from pop to rock to r&b. After winning the title of Northeast Quarterfinal Champion of the ICCA's (International Competition of Collegiate A Cappella) for the past two years and also in this year's ICCA, this talented student run group is very excited to continue competing.

2010 group members: Ingrid Andress, Cara Brindisi , Taylor Catlin, Jon Dendy , Max Deneau, Christine Gallagher, Dan Horst, Derek Jayson, Mario Jose, Hannah Juliano, Kyle Miller, Mitchell Owens, Megan Porter, Samantha Schultz, Jen Waris, and RJ Woessner.

Admission: 

Music Technology in Therapeutic and Health Settings Symposium

Wednesday / April 7, 2010 / 8:45 am
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

This one-day symposium aims to provide information and skills development for applying electronic music technologies in clinical settings. Although the day will focus on music therapy practice, emphasis will be given to interdisciplinary collaboration as an essential part of clinical services where technology is employed.

Drawing on the long-standing experience of expert clinicians and educators, the symposium will provide knowledge that extends beyond that offered by current training programs. Clinical presentations will focus on how technologies are applied to address the goals and needs of clients/patients/students in clinical settings.  Additionally, research findings from a major research project on Music Technology in Therapeutic and Health Settings will be shared in public for the first time.

Experiential demonstrations will take place in order for attendees to gain hands-on experience in technologies being discussed, e.g., Garageband, Switch in Time/Switch Jam/Switch ensemble software, assistive technology devices, Soundbeam, and a special "futures" demonstration station.

This event is free and open to the public. Attendees must register by March 31, 2010.

This symposium is generously funded by the Leverhulme Trust UK and Berklee's Music Therapy Department and Professional Education Division.

Admission: 
Free

The Banjo Project

Monday / March 8, 2010 / 4:00 pm
Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

The Banjo Project is a collaboration between Emmy-winning writer/producer Marc Fields and banjo virtuoso Tony Trischka (the project's music director), whose World Turning CD on Rounder was the inspiration. The Banjo Project brings together contemporary players in all styles-in performances and interviews-with folklorists, historians, instrument makers, and passionate amateurs to tell the story of America's instrument in all its richness and diversity.

If any musical instrument can be said to be quintessentially American, it is the banjo. Even in its construction, it tells a story of cultural exchange: the banjo is a drum with strings, a symbolic blending of African and European musical identities. Brought to the New World in the memories and traditions of enslaved Africans, repeatedly re-invented by African- and European-Americans, the banjo has shaped most American musical forms: the minstrel show (the dominant popular entertainment in the United States in the 19th century), ragtime and early jazz, old-time folk, and the folk revival, as well as blues, bluegrass, country, and new hybrids yet to be labeled.

The Banjo Project is a musical odyssey through 300 years of American history and culture, featuring contemporary banjo masters such as Pete Seeger, Earl Scruggs, Béla Fleck, Taj Mahal, Mike Seeger, Alison Brown, Sonny Osborne, Don Vappie, Cynthia Sayer, and Abby Washburn in interviews and performances, combined with rare archival footage, stills, recordings, and first-hand narratives.

Using the banjo's diverse musical styles, rich social history and colorful players as our narrative "thread," The Banjo Projecthighlights many of the issues at the heart of American culture today. In its long history, the banjo has symbolized patriotism and protest, pain and pleasure, low entertainment and sophisticated leisure. It's been a black instrument, a white instrument, a laborer's pastime and a socialite's diversion, a young person's fad and an old-timer's friend. But mostly it's been a snubbed instrument. Whether it's Dan Emmett in blackface, the jazz age flapper whamming on a four-string or Pete Seeger leading an antiwar rally with his long-necked Vega, the banjo has been the symbolic prop for stereotypes about race, class, gender, region, and political persuasion right up to the present day.

With contemporary banjo masters providing the commentary, The Banjo Project documentary weaves together rare archival footage and recordings with the narratives of historic banjo figures such as Joel Walker Sweeney, Lotta Crabtree, S.S. Stewart, Vess Ossman, Gus Cannon, Charlie Poole, Uncle Dave Macon, Elmer Snowden, Eddie Peabody, Dock Boggs, and Etta Baker. Throughout the program, experts in cultural history, folklore, popular music, and instrument design supply additional analysis and historical context: Mike Seeger, Kip Lornell, Neil Rosenberg, Joe Wilson, Tony Thomas, Lowell Schreyer, Cece Conway, Bob Winans, Sule Greg Wilson, Pete Ross, and George Wunderlich.

Of course, there's too much good music, too many good stories, and colorful characters to fit into a two-hour documentary. There's also an upcoming comprehensive DVD, to include additional performances, historical profiles, interviews, and archival footage.

Admission: 

Liberal Arts Symposium: Janis Ian

Friday / April 9, 2010 / 9:30 am
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Janis Ian is an American songwriter, singer, musician, columnist, and author who will be the featured speaker at the 16th annual Liberal Arts Symposium. Through her singing, songwriting, writing, and personal journey, she reveals how one can lead an integrated and balanced life, and connect and control one's creativity and artistry. She has had a highly successful five-decade singing and songwriting career, beginning in the 1960s. Her discography includes 52 albums; her publications include science fiction stories and novels; she has contributed regularly to the Advocate and Performing Songwriter; and she has written her autobiography, Society's Child: My Autobiography (Tarcher/Penguin Publishing, 2008). In the early 2000s, Ian was one of the first artists to allow free music downloads from her website and document that this led to dramatically increased album sales. Her 2002 Performing Songwriter article, "The Internet Debacle," written before iTunes, changed public opinion about the availability of music on the internet.

Ian is a survivor, who has an important story to tell. She published her first song at age 13, had her first hit at age 15, and won her first Grammy Award at age 24 for her song "At Seventeen." Yet she remained unsure of herself, allowed others to define her, and nearly lost her way. Her strong will, and decision to take a 10-year hiatus to learn who she was, helped her achieve a long career. Her journey demonstrates the importance of lifelong learning to attain success as a person and artist.

At the symposium, Ian will speak about her life and about the role of artists today. The symposium will also feature a student ensemble, who will perform Ian's work. The top three winners of the Songwriting for Social Change contest will also perform. Prior to Ian's visit, faculty and staff will be invited to read her autobiography together and discuss that work. Students will read some or all of that book in several classes. While on campus, Ian will visit classes. She will also meet with the Berklee Union of Gays, Lesbians and Everyone Else (BUGLE) and with GLBT Allies, the gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered members of the Berklee community. In addition, she will meet with female students, faculty, and staff to discuss issues surrounding women in the music industry. (Note: the Liberal Arts Symposium will be cosponsored by the Liberal Arts Department, the Office of Faculty Development, the Office for Cultural Diversity, and the Professional Education Division Herb Alpert Scholar Program.)

Admission: 

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