Concert

Toby Lightman/Lucy Woodward/Rachel Platten

Tuesday / October 7, 2008 / 8:00 p.m.
Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Toby Lightman

Toby Lightman's new independently released album, Let Go follows her two Atlantic Records releases, 2004's Little Things and 2006's Bird on a Wire. She's toured the country extensively, having appeared with such artists as James Blunt, Gavin DeGraw, Jewel, Rob Thomas, and on one memorable evening, Prince. USA Today wrote: "No small talent, Toby Lightman continues to shine a light on her knack for making rich, soulful pop." tobylightman.com.

Lucy Woodward is... hot and bothered, and that's the name of her sensational new album out now exclusively at Barnes & Noble stores nationwide. Billboard said the award-winning songwriter "boasts staggering versatility—a sonic turnstile that flips through dreamy pop, jazz, and bluesy bebop." lucywoodward.com.

Say hello to Boston native Rachel Platten. The Boston Globe called Rachel's first release "breathtaking, brilliant, [with] beautifully crafted lyrics," and the Village Voice praised a recent show, claiming "Rachel's got it all—she'll fill your indie sweet tooth and top it off with a heaping dose of blue-eyed soul." myspace.com/rachelplattenband.

Admission: 
$15 general admission, student discount available at the Berklee Performance Center box office

Shearwater/Hospital Ships

Sunday / October 19, 2008 / 8:00 p.m.
Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Shearwater

Hailed as "almost impossibly majestic and beautiful" (NPR), Shearwater's Palo Santo (2007, Matador), a suite of ethereal but oddly disquieting art-rock songs loosely centered around the life and death of singer Christa Paffgen (a.k.a. Nico), marked the Texan quartet's debut on the national stage. The New York Times named the album one of the year's very best, and the band's singular combination of sonic abandon and restraint, spun around the soaring, otherworldly voice of part-time ornithologist Jonathan Meiburg, drew comparisons to late-period Talk Talk and both the lovely and anxious moments of Eno's early solo work.

This year's much-anticipated Rook takes the band into realms both richer and stranger. Though a similarly haunted, elegiac mood pervades the album, Rook is its own animal, at once more accessible and more accomplished than its predecessor, with a depth and grandeur that seem improbably packed into the album's tidy 35 minutes.

Admission: 
$15 general admission, student discount available at the Berklee Performance Center box office

Fall Flutes

Thursday / November 20, 2008 / 1:00 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Berklee's stellar Flute Choir, under the direction of Woodwind Department faculty member Wendy Rolfe, will delight the audience with music from Brazil, France, and beyond. Come and hear featured flute soloists with guitar, piano, percussion, and more.

Admission: 

Murder By Death/William E. Whitmore/J-Roddy Walston and the Business

Saturday / November 15, 2008 / 7:00 p.m.
Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Murder By Death

The members of Murder By Death are emerging as true artists in the zero-boundary sense: cinematic storytellers whose albums come together in an essential whole, and players whose jaw-dropping performances make you yearn for the chance to experience their energy up close and in-person. Also appearing: William E. Whitmore, J-Roddy Walston and the Business.

Admission: 
$13 advance, $15 day of show

Contemporary Writing and Production Department Faculty Concert

Thursday / November 13, 2008 / 7:15 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115

This year’s annual concert by the Contemporary Writing and Production Department faculty will showcase CWP artist-in-residence composer/percussionist Roland Vazquez with an ensemble of Berklee faculty. Several of Vazquez’s compositions will be featured as well as new works by CWP faculty. The concert will focus on the music of the Afro-Latin diaspora as well as an eclectic mix of styles ranging from jazz to funk to world music. The concert is part of the Professional Writing Division's series featuring Latin American composers, and is led by Matthew Nicholl, chair of the CWP Department.

About Roland Vazquez: In 1979, Billboard called Vazquez's first international release "a decade ahead of its time." Moving to New York in 1981, he continued to develop his "funky-salsa-bebop" style. A former faculty member of the Manhattan School of Music and the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Vazquez developed a historical Afro-Latin jazz curriculum and wrote and performed in that style. Now back in New York, he has been touring with his quintet featuring new works with Joel Frahm (sax), Anthony Jackson (contrabass guitar), Mike Lipsey (percussion), and Mark Soskin (piano).

Admission: 

T Hartman Finale

Wednesday / November 12, 2008 / 6:30 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

An eclectic mix of groove, funk, jazz, and fusion originals and arrangements will be performed by drummer Thomas Hartman and his group including bassist Zak Croxall and guitarist Rany Runyon.

Admission: 

Sandro Morales’s Sounds from Venezuela

Wednesday / July 22, 2009 / 8:15 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Sounds from Venezuela will feature a 40-piece orchestra performing Sandro Morales's arrangements and original compositions in traditional Venezuelan styles, mixed with jazz and classical influences.

Admission: 

Fall Together

Wednesday / October 29, 2008 / 8:15 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Jazz Composition Department faculty members perform in settings from small to large ensemble. Featured composers include Greg Hopkins, Ken Pullig, Marc Rossi, Bruce Thomas, and Phil Wilson. Tre Corda—the renowned trio of Eugene Friessen (cello), Hopkins (trumpet), and Tim Ray (piano)—will be special guests performing a new work by Hopkins. Pullig will feature guest vocalist Rebecca Shrimpton in his extended composition “Politickle Your Fancy" with a text based on the current presidential election. Rossi will feature his quintet. Large ensemble pieces by Thomas and Wilson (Wizard of Oz Suite) round out the evening's program.

Admission: 

Berklee Celebrates 50 Years of the Bossa Nova, Featuring Oscar Castro-Neves

Tuesday / October 21, 2008 / 8:15 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115

The bossa nova was ultimately defined by the guitar playing and singing style of João Gilberto. His unique interpretation contrasted with the predominating nostalgic, romantic, and often dramatic ballads, boleros and samba-canções of the late 50s. His nearly vibrato-free vocals, syncopated samba rhythms, and smooth voicings on guitar created an immediate impact on many of the young musicians of his time.

But it was the music of another young composer, Antonio Carlos Jobim, that would infuse the bossa nova movement with sophisticated harmonies, melodies, and form. Together with poet Vinícius de Moraes, Jobim would write the most famous tunes that soon would be performed and recorded around the world. The movement would attract a new wave of young musicians and composers, including Carlos Lyra, Billy Blanco, Baden Powell, Sylvia Telles, Nara Leão, Newton Mendonça, Toquinho, Marcos Valle, Roberto Menescal, and many others.

Oscar Castro-Neves, then only 16 years old, was among these musicians, and his first recorded song, "Chora Tua Tristeza," became a national hit in Brazil and generated more than 50 cover versions. Along with Antonio Carlos Jobim, João Gilberto, and others, he emerged in the early 1960s as one of the founding figures of Bossa Nova. He helped lead the bossa nova invasion in the U.S., playing a central role as a performer and accompanist for other noted Brazilian musicians at the historic presentation of Brazil's new music at Carnegie Hall.

Living in the U.S. since 1971, Mr. Castro-Neves has a distinguished career as a composer, arranger and producer, and he has collaborated with Antonio Carlos Jobim, Elis Regina, Flora Purim, Yo-Yo Ma, Joe Henderson, Michael Jackson, Barbara Streisand, Stevie Wonder, Stan Getz, Eliane Elias, João Gilberto, Lee Ritenour, Airto Moreira, Edu Lobo, Toots Thielemans, Paul Winter, Diane Schuur, Herbie Hancock, Ella Fitzgerald, Ottmar Liebert, Lisa Ono and countless other Brazilian, jazz, and pop music stars.

Read more about Berklee's celebration of the bossa nova's 50th anniversary.

Admission: 

Locksley/Hymns

Sunday / October 5, 2008 / 8:00 p.m.
Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Adapted from a letter on the Locksley myspace page:

We’re Locksley. We listen to just about any music we can. Our first album, Don’t Make Me Wait, has been compared to the music from the 1960s quite a bit, especially the Beatles, a generous compliment by any measure and not inaccurate in our initial aims. The Sixties are definitely a jumping-off point for us. We like good songs, songs that you can just sing while you’re walking around or showering or driving. Songs that you can sing along with. But we also like music that’s a little bit fast and/or exciting, which is why we love the Ramones and the Stooges and Richard Hell and the Strokes and the Rapture and Dr. Dre and Wham and "Miss Independent," by Kelly Clarkson. So, there it is.

Hymns' debut LP, Brother/Sister, is an 11-song collection of country rock/folk/pop that garnered critical praise. Its sophomore effort, Travel In Herds, has an exciting and fresh sound, blending horns, pump organs, saxophones, and harmonies, while remaining faithful to the original Hymns sound.

Admission: 
$10 General Admission

Pages