Concert

Open Mic Night

Wednesday / September 1, 2010 / 7:00 p.m.
Cafe 939
939 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Sign-ups will start at 6:30 p.m. First come, first serve. Performers are allowed 10 minutes or two songs. Microphones, piano, and DIs are provided. No drums allowed, but light percussion is okay.

Admission: 
Free

Patrizio Buanne

Saturday / October 2, 2010 / 8:00 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Patrizio Buanne

Style, sophistication, elegance. . . Where can we find that old-school cool in our consumer culture of instantly disposable celebrity? Time to meet Patrizio Buanne. Tall, dark, and handsome, perfectly groomed and impeccably dressed, the clean-cut Italian with the rich baritone voice is an enigma. 

Inspired by the singers of yesteryear, Buanne harks back to a time when a man would not dream of singing onstage in anything less than a suit, shoes polished, clean-shaven, hair neatly brushed, with a dab of cologne behind the ears. 

Nothing strange about that, you might say. Except that Buanne is only 26 years old—and hopelessly devoted to his art: romantic crooning. Dean Martin, Paul Anka, Tom Jones, along with the traditional Italian singers—these are the men he idolizes. Unfashionable? Perhaps, on first impression. But as they say: style is temporary and class is permanent.

Admission: 
$65, $45, reserved seating

The Wild Magnolias

Saturday / September 25, 2010 / 4:45 p.m.
Target Stage
681 Columbus Ave.
Boston
MA
United States
02120
The Wild Magnolias

A group calling itself the Wild Magnolias, participating in the local "Indian masking" traditions, and performing New Orleans Mardi Gras music extends at least back into the 1950s. The group's lead member was called the Big Chief, and at least three Big Chiefs are known to have headed the band for short stints prior to 1964: Leon, Flap, and Joe Lee Davis. In 1964, Bo Dollis became Big Chief of the group, having previously participated in other Mardi Gras tribes, such as the White Eagles and the Golden Arrows. Dollis's name is virtually synonymous with the Wild Magnolias Mardi Gras Indian tribe. He has been a legend almost from the beginning, because he could improvise well and sing with a voice as sweet as Sam Cooke, but rough and streetwise, with an edge that comes from barroom jam sessions and leading hundreds of second-lining dancers through the streets at Carnival time. Dollis and Monk Boudreaux, chief of the Golden Eagles, have recorded James "Sugar Boy" Crawford's 1954 r&b hit "Jackomo, Jackomo" and the classic Mardi Gras song "Handa Wanda." The Wild Magnolias and the Golden Eagles have taken Bo Dollis and Monk Boudreaux from the ghettos and brought them to places like Carnegie Hall in New York; the Smithsonian Folklife Festival in Washington, D.C.; London; Nice; and Berlin. Wherever they go, listeners will hear an authentic music to which New Orleans owes so much.

Admission: 
Free

Young@Heart Chorus

Friday / October 1, 2010 / 7:30 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Young@Heart

Young@Heart is an entertainment group composed at present of people at least 70 years of age. Some have prior professional theater or music experience, others have performed at the amateur level, and some have no experience whatsoever. They are particularly noted for their unconventional covers of rock, punk, and other modern pop music songs. A 2008 British documentary followed their preparation for a concert in their hometown of Northampton, Massachusetts.

When Bob Cilman and Judith Sharpe organized the Young@Heart in 1982, all of the members lived in an elderly housing project called the Walter Salvo House. That first group included elders who lived through both World Wars. One of the members had fought in the Battle of the Somme as a 16-year-old and another, Anna Main, lost her husband in the First World War. Main was a stand-up comic who at 88 told jokes that only she could get away with.

The current performers in Young@Heart range in age from 73 to 89. None was part of the original group that formed in 1982, but all have kept alive the spirit of the early pioneers and continue to push the group into glorious new directions.

Please note that the mezzanine and first and second balcony sections of the Berklee Performance Center are accessible by staircase only.

Admission: 
$61, $46, $36, reserved seating

Elan Trotman

Wednesday / September 22, 2010 / 8:00 p.m.
Scullers Jazz Club
400 Soldiers Field Road
Boston
MA
United States
02134
Elan Trotman

Although during the day Berklee alumnus/music teacher Elan Trotman is found cultivating the minds of children to love music, at night he is a well-known member of the Boston, Providence, and New England music scenes.

Trotman has performed, recorded, and toured with an elite group of artists—among them are Grammy Award–winning r&b vocalists, Roberta Flack and Brian McKnight, Grammy-nominated saxophonist Kirk Whalum. He serves as the musical director, saxophonist/keyboardist, and longtime member of baseball pitcher Bronson Arroyo's band. He has also won awards for Best New Act (1998) at Barbados Nation Awards and Best Jazz Artist (2008) New England Urban Music Awards.

Admission: 
$20

Tronzo/Raberg Duo

Wednesday / September 15, 2010 / 7:30 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

This is a concert of new music improvisations utilizing slide and prepared guitar, acoustic bass and electronics. Featuring David Tronzo and Bruno Raberg.

Admission: 

Bob Christopherson: Nothing Old-Nothing New

Monday / September 13, 2010 / 7:30 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Bob Christopherson performs in the opening concert for the second annual Piano Monday Series. An expression of original compositions and arrangements featuring Ron Mahdi, Casey Scheuerell, Eva Christopherson, and Bob Christopherson.

Admission: 

Gail McArthur's Favorite Connections

Wednesday / September 22, 2010 / 7:30 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Faculty member Gail McArthur leads an impressive line-up, playing a program of modern jazz originals with influences from many styles. Gail McArthur (saxophones), Baron Browne from Vital Information (bass), Steve Langone (drums), and Bobby Gallegos (trumpet).

Admission: 

The Bad Plus

Friday / September 17, 2010 / 7:30 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115
The Bad Plus

Arguably one of the biggest breakout stories of jazz in the past decade, the Bad Plus (Reid Anderson, bass; Ethan Iverson, piano; and David King, drums) has connected with the jazz world and beyond with These Are the Vistas (2003), Give (2004), Suspicious Activity? (2005), and Prog (2007). All three members of the Bad Plus hail from the Midwest. The roots of the group date back to circa 1984 when King first heard Anderson sing in a junior high rock band. By 1989, Anderson and Iverson were playing free jazz at restaurants throughout America’s dairy land. While 1990 marks King, Anderson, and Iverson’s first musical encounter, the group’s eponymous debut album was released in 2001 on Fresh Sound, a Spanish independent label. A 2002 performance at New York’s Village Vanguard led to the signing with Columbia Records. Since its debut recording, the group has been touring relentlessly, playing to and establishing one of the most diverse and ecstatic cross-over audiences at jazz clubs, symphony halls, and rock venues in the U.S. and abroad. Performing both original compositions and a variety of covers, the Bad Plus brings a winningly disparate body of influences to the stage.

Admission: 
$30, $25 reserved seating

Kurt Rosenwinkel and OJM

Wednesday / September 15, 2010 / 7:30 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115
Kurt Rosenwinkel

A native of the great jazz city of Philadelphia, Kurt Rosenwinkel studied at Berklee and gained his first formative professional experiences in bands led by Gary Burton and Paul Motian. He soon became a major force on the New York scene, gaining a reputation as an innovative bandleader, composer, and improviser. He displayed a strong command of jazz tradition and a great love of standard tunes, but also a determination to articulate his own language and create on his own terms. Following his early albums, East Coast Love Affair and Intuit, came four highly regarded discs on the Verve label: The Enemies of Energy, The Next Step, Heartcore, and Deep Song. In particular, Heartcore, coproduced by Q-Tip (formerly of A Tribe Called Quest), revealed Rosenwinkel's life of sonic exploration beyond the jazz realm. The Remedy preserves that aesthetic newness in the context of a live acoustic quintet. As he progressed steadily as a leader and sideman with the likes of Joe Henderson, Brian Blade, Joshua Redman, and Danilo Perez, Rosenwinkel also garnered impressive professional and critical acclaim. He now is a tenured professor at the Jazz Institute of Berlin.

Admission: 
$25, $20 reserved seating

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