Clinics and Master Classes

Nacho Mena

Tuesday / November 16, 2010 / 3:00 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Chilean drummer and Berklee alumnus Nacho Mena gives a clinic as part of Berklee's Latin Music and Culture Celebration. Mena was born in Santiago, Chile, and became interested in music at an early age. In 1970 he moved to Rio de Janeiro with his mother and brother, studied at the Institute Villa-Lobos. His first album, Mail Bag Blues, drew excellent reviews internationally. In 1974, Mena received a scholarship to study arrangement, composition, and drums at Berklee. Ornette Coleman was looking for a drummer and percussionist, and Mena went to New York to join the group.

He returned to Rio in 1980 and formed a new group, Rapa Nui, with whom he recorded his first album with his own compositions. In 1985 he was asked to be assistant producer of Rock in Rio I with Luis Oscar Niemeyer. From 1993 to 1996, Mena ran the Ritmo jazz club in Rio de Janeiro with the owner of the Ex-People. He went back to Chile in 2002 as creative director and music producer at Pérez Rosales University until 2006. That year he established a music career and technology program at the Universidad del Pacifico with great success.

Today, Mena is director of the Music Department of the School of Music and Technology at Universidad del Pacifico, and performs with his new group with musicians Andrés Sylleros, Marcelo Aedo, Andrés Pérez, Fernando Gonzalez, Pedro Melo, Alejandro Sanchez, and Nicolas Severin. The band is about to release a new album.

Read more about the Latin Music and Culture Celebration.

Admission: 

Berklee Clinics in Athens and Thessaloniki, Greece

Tuesday / November 9, 2010 / 3:30 p.m.
Philippos Nakas Conservatory
41 Hippocratous Street
Athens
United States
106 80

Berklee faculty members visit the Philippos Nakas Conservatory main campuses in Athens and Thessaloniki, Greece to present clinics and master classes on a range of music topics, including improvisation, rhythm section playing, drummer set, songwriting, and stage performance.

The clinics will include; saxophonist and assistant vice president for international programs Greg Badolato, drummer and assistant chair of ensembles Sean Skeete and vocalist, pianist, songwriter, and professor of ensembles Nancy Morris.

The detailed schedule of events is as follows;

Tuesday, November 9, Nakas in Thessaloniki

4:30 p.m. Sean Skeete Rhythm Section Clinic

6:00 p.m. Nancy Morris Stage Performance Workshop

7:30 p.m. Faculty and student jam sessions. Bring your instruments.

Friday, November 12, Nakas in Athens

4:30 PM - Sean Skeete Rhythm Section Clinic

6:00 PM - Nancy Morris Stage Performance Workshop

7:30 PM - Faculty and student jam sessions. Bring your instruments.

Additional sessions to be determined.  Visit the Nakas website for more details.  

Admission: 
Free

C4 Clinic

Tuesday / November 9, 2010 / 3:00 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

The origins of C4 Trío is directly connected with the international competition La Siembra del Cuatro, created by professor Cheo Hurtado, in which Jorge Glem, Héctor Molina, and Edward Ramírez had excellent performances as cuatristas in 2004 and 2005. For this reason, in November 2005, these three musicians were invited, along with a fourth cuatrista, Rafael Martínez, to participate in a concert coordinated by Multifonía Foundation. During this concert, each one of them would show their skills performing solos in cuatro, but then, these musicians decided spontaneously to perform making duos, then trios, and finally a quartet for the closure of the concert. That specific moment caused a strong effect on the genesis of this ensemble having the Venezuelan cuatro as the main instrument.

Coming from different Venezuelan cities—Jorge Glem from Cumaná, Héctor Molina from Mérida, and Edward Ramírez from Caracas—they converged in the Venezuelan capital to shape up one of the most important music proposal of the last years. In 2006, the group assumed definitely the name C4 Trío after the recording of its first self-titled album under the music production of Aquiles Báez, having also the participation of many national important groups and musicians such as Serenata Guayanesa, Rafael "el Pollo" Brito, Marina Bravo, Zeneida Rodríguez, Adolfo Herrera, Roberto Koch, Edwin Arellano, and Aquiles Báez himself. In just a few weeks, the album became a music reference in Venezuela, reaching a double Golden Record because of the number of sold-out copies.

This discography production trigged C4 Trío’s popularity, leading to an intense artistic activity on the most prestigious Venezuelan stages and a great international agenda, taking them twice to the Venezuelan Sounds Festival (2006, 2007) coordinated by the Embassy of Venezuela in the United States, including concerts in the Bolívar Hall of Washington, Smithsonian Institution Building, the Castle, and in the Kennedy Center. In England, the trio participated at the Salisbury International Art Festival 2007 and performed at the Bolivar Hall in London. In 2008, they performed at the Salon Azul de la Independencia (Blue Hall of Independence) in Montevideo, Uruguay and in the Mercado Cultural de Bahia (Cultural Market of Bahia) in Brazil. They had also shared stage with a significant number of national and international important artists like Jorge Drexler, Soledad Bravo, Gilberto Santa Rosa, Rafael “el Pollo” Brito, El Cuarteto, Edmar Castañeda, Eddy Marcano, Juan Tomás Martínez, Aquiles Báez, Alexis Cárdenas, Cheo Hurtado, and Gonzalo Teppa, among others.

In 2009, C4 Trío released a second album Entre Manos (Among Hands), including a CD plus a live DVD, exposing the skills of these three talented musicians onstage. 

C4 Trío is a founding member of the collective project Movida Acústica Urbana, (MAU)—Urban Acoustic Gathering—with whom it recorded in 2009 a live album along with the work of other five Venezuelan groups. 

Read more about the Latin Music and Culture Celebration.

 

Admission: 

Berklee in Sao Paulo

Monday / November 8, 2010 / 9:00 a.m.
Conservatorio Musical Souza Lima
Rua José Maria Lisboa, 745
Såo Paulo
United States
01423-001

Matt Glaser, Jim Odgren, Bruno Raberg, and Sam Skau visit Conservatorio Musical Souza Lima to present a series of clinics, master classes, and a concert.

Admission: 
Free

Maria Mulata Clinic

Thursday / November 4, 2010 / 4:00 p.m.
David Friend Recital Hall
921 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02115

Maria Mulata presents a clinic as part of Berklee's Latin Culture Celebration. Mulata is one of the amazing new up-and-coming female singers from Colombia. Her style blends the rich cultural influences of Totó la Momposina, Etelvina Maldonado, Petrona Martinez, and Nidia Góngora, among many others. She has been sought out for her memorable, high-energy performances which incorporate an array of new sounds (new to this particular Colombian genre, that is) in her vastly folkloric repertoire.

Mulata has a degree in performance from the prestigious Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá, Colombia. She is the 2007 winner of La Gaviota de Plata from the world-renowned Festival Viña del Mar in Chile, as well as a 2009 Nuestra Tierra award from RCN (Colombia's NBC equivalent). In 2008, she received a Golden Record award for her album Itinerario de Tambores. Later that year, her record Los Vestidos de la Cumbia was listed in the Top 10 of one of Colombia's most illustrious magazines, Semana. Mulata has performed at some of the most prestigious music festivals around the globe, including those in Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, México, Chile, South Africa, France, Germany, and Belgium. Most recently she was a decorated guest at the ceremony for Colombia's bicentennial.

Her performances have captivated audiences, taking them on a journey through the sounds of the Caribbean, the Colombia Amazonas, and exciting folklore of the Pacific. In addition to singing in her native tongue, Multata interprets compositions in Sanandresano Creole, Portuñol (a mix of Portuguese and Spanish), and a distinct dialect from the town of Palenque. She is one of the most promising and versatile performers in a new wave of artists representing traditional South American music.

With the help of her musical director, arranger, and bassist Esther Rojas, Maria Mulata will be performing traditional Colombian rhythms mixed with original compositions from styles including cumbia, porro, fandango, currulao, champeta, chande, and tamborito. She will be joined by a student group organized by LCMC '10 coordinator Oscar Stagnaro and Colombian native Leonardo Tatis.

Read more about the Latin Music and Culture Celebration.

Admission: 

Oscar Stagnaro: Mariano Martos—Flamenco Bass

Tuesday / November 2, 2010 / 7:00 p.m.
Berk Recital Hall
1140 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02215

Mariano Martos, who has taught workshops on flamenco bass all over the world, presents a clinic and concert. Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, he studied at the Escuela Superior de Jazz Walter Malosetti, with Bucky Arcella at the Estudio Escola de Música in Santiago de Compostela, with Carles Benavent (from Paco de Lucía's band), and with Rafael Cañizares in Barcelona.

Read more about the Latin Music and Culture Celebration

Admission: 

Larry Harlow Clinic

Tuesday / November 16, 2010 / 12:00 p.m.
Berk Recital Hall
1140 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02215

Larry Harlow is a living legend of Afro-Cuban music. Though jazz and the piano stylings of Art Tatum were the first loves of this Brooklyn native, the music and culture of the New York Latino community fascinated him. After graduating from the famed LaGuardia High School of Music and Art, he traveled to Cuba in the late 1950s and began a two-year adventure studying Afro-Cuban music in all its manifestations. On his return to New York he quickly made a name for himself as a top bandleader and was signed by the new Fania record company.

"El Judio Maravilloso," as he is affectionately called, revolutionized what is known today as "salsa," developing the explosive sound of the early-'70s bands. He studied audio engineering at the Institute of Audio Research and produced over 260 albums for Fania alone. Harlow is also the producer/pianist for the legendary Fania All-Stars, which spread clave consciousness the world over. He coproduced, wrote music for, and starred in Our Latin Thing and Salsa, two of the definitive documentaries on Afro-Cuban music in New York City. In 2003, Harlow's Latin Jazz Encounter released the albumLive at Birdland, beginning a new phase in his career. He is currently touring with his new Latin Legends Band.

As a governor of the New York chapter of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences, Harlow emphasized the role of Latin musicians. He received the Grammy Trustees Award in 2008 and was inducted into the International Latin Music Hall of Fame in 2000.

Harlow holds a B.A. in music from Brooklyn College and a master's degree in philosophy from the New School of Social Research. He regularly lectures and conducts residencies at Harvard, Yale, and the California state universities.

Harlow presents this clinic as part of the Latin Music and Culture Celebration.

Read more about the Latin Music and Culture Celebration.

Admission: 

Envisioning 21st-Century Music Business Models: Artist Development

Friday / March 25, 2011 / 7:00 p.m.
Berklee Performance Center
136 Massachusetts Avenue
Boston
MA
United States
02115

A clinic session with performance techniques/artist development specialist Tom Jackson and student ensembles.

Admission: 

Randy Weston Clinic

Wednesday / November 17, 2010 / 12:00 p.m.
Oliver Colvin Recital Hall
1140 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02215

After contributing six decades of musical direction and genius, Randy Weston remains one of the world's foremost pianists and composers today, a true innovator and visionary. Encompassing the vast rhythmic heritage of Africa, his global creations continue to inform and inspire.

"Weston has the biggest sound of any jazz pianist since Ellington and Monk, as well as the richest, most inventive beat," states jazz critic Stanley Crouch, "but his art is more than projection and time; it's the result of a studious and inspired intelligence . . . an intelligence that is creating a fresh synthesis of African elements with jazz technique."

Weston, born in Brooklyn, New York in 1926, didn't have to travel far to hear the early jazz giants that were to influence him. Though Weston cites Count Basie, Nat King Cole, Art Tatum, and of course, Duke Ellington as his other piano heroes, it was Monk who had the greatest impact. "He was the most original I ever heard," Weston remembers. "He  played  like  they  must  have  played  in  Egypt  5,000  years  ago."

Weston’s first recording as a leader came in 1954 on Riverside Records, Randy Weston Plays Cole Porter. It was in the '50s when Randy Weston played around New York with Cecil Payne and Kenny Dorham and wrote many of his best loved tunes, "Saucer Eyes," "Pam's Waltz," "Little Niles," and, "Hi-Fly."  Weston (who is 6' 8") says his greatest hit, "Hi-Fly," is a "tale of being my height and looking down at the ground." Randy Weston has never failed to make the connections between African and American music. His dedication is due in large part to his father, Frank Edward Weston, who told his son that he was, "an African born in America." "He told me I had to learn about myself and about him and about my grandparents," Weston said in an interview, "and the only way to do it was I'd have to go back to the motherland one day."

In the late '60s, Weston left the country. But instead of moving to Europe like so many of his contemporaries, Weston went to Africa. Though he settled in Morocco, he traveled throughout the continent, tasting the musical fruits of other nations. One of his most memorable experiences was the 1977 Nigerian festival, which drew artists from 60 cultures. "At the end," Weston says, "we all realized that our music was different but the same, because if you take out the African elements of bossa nova, samba, jazz, blues, you have nothing. . . . To me, it's Mother Africa's way of surviving in the new world."

Admission: 

The Blue Four: Keeping Your Sound "Authentic" to True Blues

Monday / November 8, 2010 / 12:00 p.m.
Berk Recital Hall
1140 Boylston Street
Boston
MA
United States
02215

With two critically hailed CDs of their own and two full decades of playing together honing their musical attack to a diamond-hard edge, San Diego–based guitarist Chris James and bassist Patrick Rynn are at the forefront of today's traditional blues movement. Gonna Boogie Now, their recent album for Earwig Records, has stirred up a similarly heightened level of critical buzz as their 2008 disc Stop and Think About It, which was nominated for a Blues Music Award and won a Blues Blast Award for Best New Artist Debut.

The duo's high-energy approach is deeply rooted in the postwar sound—Chicago, Memphis, Mississippi Delta—yet incorporates a singular spin. Their repertoire is loaded with splendid, well-crafted originals. James and Rynn inaugurated their musical partnership in 1990, when both young bluesmen were living in Chicago for the first time. The sartorially splendiferous duo has been inseparable ever since, their telepathic onstage interplay always in dazzling evidence.

Born in North Carolina but raised in the warm and sunny climes of San Diego, James got hooked on the blues early, joining the band of guitarist Tomcat Courtney as a 13-year-old harpist. He soon switched to bass, then guitar, soaking up every nuance of the genre from each master he encountered.

Rynn hails from Toledo, Ohio and learned the bass in a high school jazz orchestra before a chance encounter with an Elmore James cassette forever changed his musical journey. A five-year gig with local blues heroes Art and Roman Griswold soon ensued.

The pair met in Chicago and started working together, James showing Rynn the finer points of traditional blues until they thought as one. Their first major break came when drummer Sam Lay asked both of them to join his band, a gig that lasted for half a decade. There they encountered young harpist Rob Stone, the threesome developing a keen musical chemistry that endures to this day. Back in Chicago, the trio formed a new combo, the C-Notes, and cut a debut CD, No Worries, in 1998. Just My Luck, the band's encore release, emerged on Earwig in 2003. That musical partnership is still going strong; the three write all of their original material together and appear on one another's CDs (James and Rynn are prominent on Rob's latest Earwig disc, Back Around Here). Along the way, James and Rynn have worked with many of the greatest postwar bluesmen still active. They were close to Dave Myers, the late bassist of the Aces, toured worldwide and recorded as the backing band for over four years with guitarist Jody Williams (they're on his '04 disc You Left Me in the Dark), and backed pianist Dennis Binder on his 2007 album Hole in That Jug. They've made several recordings with a variety of blues luminaries, toured Europe, Japan, Canada, as well as the United States, and appeared in the Martin Scorsese–produced PBS film documentary Godfathers and Sons. Particularly noteworthy was Rynn's 2010 Blues Music Award nomination as Best Blues Bassist.

Gonna Boogie Now is a hard-hitting collection with a spectacular lineup of guest stars. Pianists Henry Gray and David Maxwell and drummers Sam Lay and Willie Hayes helped James and Rynn cook up an encore outing sure to delight any traditional electric blues fan. Like its predecessor, the critically lauded CD has been high on the Living Blues Radio Charts in recent months, making it clear that this traditionally rooted duo will be playing their sizzling brand of blues for a long time to come.

Admission: 

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