Courses

e.g. AR or AR-211
e.g. Film or "Bass Lab"

FS-435

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-340 and FS-341
Department Code: FILM

In this course, students will examine and explore the challenges posed to a composer in addressing certain classic moments that occur as standard fare in dramatic and comedic films. Such moments include, but would not be limited to: The Kiss, The Revelation, The Chase, The Punch Line, The Victory, The Hero's Death, etc. The typical class session will be divided between a critical review of the previous week's writing assignment and a lecture on the next moment to be examined and scored. Lectures will be far-ranging, and examples will be drawn from the work of prominent film and TV composers. Students will learn how to confront the challenges posed by such parameters as limited budgets, period settings, anticipated sound effects, docudramatics, etc.

FS-441

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: FILM majors
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: CM-311 or FS-351;FS-340, and FS-341; FS-375 must be taken concurrently with FS-441
Department Code: FILM

This course will provide opportunities for scoring scenes that use the same thematic material for one movie. Students will learn to create appropriate themes, develop variations, create a suite of proposed thematic material for a director, and score several scenes from the same film. Students will use MIDI sequences as well as live players to record their projects. All recorded projects will be conducted by the composers and screened for faculty evaluation. This course will also cover the basic knowledge of the music business as it relates to the film composer. Topics to be discussed will include initial meetings with directors, royalties, contracts, agents, the musicians union, and budgeting for a project.

FS-461

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-361 and FS-241
Department Code: FILM

An examination of advanced film scoring functions available in various software applications. Mac applications include Digital Performer, Logic Pro, Kontakt, and Reason. Requires the use of multi-computer workstation setups: Mac for sequencing, PC for sample or software synthesis playback, Kontakt or GigaStudio for various sample libraries, as well as V-Stack as a host for VST instruments. Scoring projects include a cartoon, TV commercial, and video game footage.

FS-468

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-340, FS-341, and either FS-351 or CM-311
Department Code: FILM

This course focuses on the new musical and technological techniques and aesthetics of contemporary film composing. The use of synthesizers and sound design, computers and advanced sequencing techniques, rock, pop, and other nontraditional music in the film scoring process, and the contemporary aesthetics of modern filmmakers and audiences will be investigated.

FS-471

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: FS-371
Department Code: FILM

This course continues to build on the foundations learned in FS-371. It features advanced approaches to scoring for video games, including implementation using middleware such as XACT, Wwise, and Fmod. It includes examples, guest speakers, and applied scoring to develop the knowledge and skills that games composers and implementers are using in today's industry. This course deepens the preparation of students for entry level work in music at a game development company or as a freelance game music professional, including experience with typical game music workflow using version control technologies.

FS-475

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-375
Department Code: FILM

An advanced music editing course dealing with standard film and television industry procedures. Intended for the student who demonstrates technical fluidity with editing equipment and who intends to pursue a career in this field. Emphasis is on the responsibilities of a music editor for the scored film, from temp tracks and spotting through dubbing. Instruction will include digital editing techniques on a multitrack digital audio workstation, as well as the necessary preparations for delivering music to the dubbing stage in various surround sound formats.

FS-481

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: Take FS-340, FS-341 and written approval of course chair
Department Code: FILM

A real-world immersion course in which students learn about aspects of film scoring that go beyond composition and production by scoring actual student films. These will include one collaboration with a music production and engineering student who is creating sound design, as well as at least one student film from a local college. Some of these student films will be provided through the professors; however, students will be able to find their own films if they wish. Lectures and discussions will consist of real-world examples of how the director-composer relationship works, as well as critiques of student projects and processes. Admission to the course is by application.

FS-487

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: FILM majors
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: FS-441 and FS-375
Department Code: FILM

This course focuses on production of the capstone film scoring projects and graduation portfolio, and provides for individual attention within a small group setting. Career planning, relevant business aspects, and the film and television industry's expectations of the composer/music editor also will be discussed both in the small group meetings with the listed faculty, and in weekly seminars with faculty and visiting artist guest speakers.

FS-495

2 credit(s)
Course Chair: George Clinton
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: FILM majors
Prerequisites: Sixth-semester standing and written approval of the course chair
Department Code: FILM

Monitored and evaluated professional work experience in an environment related to the film scoring major. Placement is limited to situations available from or approved by the Office of Experiential Learning and the Film Scoring Department chair or designee. To apply for an internship, students must see the internship coordinator in the Office of Experiential Learning prior to registering. Note: Equivalent credit for prior experience is not available due to the requirement of concurrent contract between the employer/supervisor and the college. International students in F-1 status must obtain authorization on their Form I-20 from the Counseling and Advising Center prior to beginning an internship.

FS-510

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department Code: SFTV

In this course, students explore the conceptual and collaborative processes that result in the successful creation of music for visual media. Scoring for film, television, and video games is essentially musical storytelling, and the composer cannot hope to do this without the tools for narrative analysis. Through in-depth examination of script, style, finished scenes, and exemplary scores, students learn methodically the steps that successful composers take in preparation for scoring, as well as strategies for getting past the first blank page. The ability to conceive the shape of the score before a single note is written is critical, and this begins in: 1) collaboration with the filmmaking team; 2) analyzing dramatic intent; 3) spotting the film for music; 4) determining the function of music; 5) developing a music concept that supports directorial intent; and 6) determining the elements of the music itself, including style, instrumentation, and genre. Students will analyze entire projects and explore a diverse range of eras, genres, dramatic ideas, musical vocabularies, forms, styles, and orchestrations.

FS-520

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department Code: SFTV

In this course, students become familiar with the musical requirements and expectations of a wide range of cinematic categories and forms, from classic genre film to episodic television comedy and drama to documentary and opinion/propaganda pieces. The conventions of genre are now an established part of every composer's vocabulary. They can be violated, subverted, or updated, but they must first be mastered. Areas of study include the following: -comedy, both feature and episodic, including comedic montage and timing -classic drama, including death of principal character, abandonment, and triumph -action and suspense, including the chase, natural catastrophe, cloak and dagger, and sports -period drama, including devices to establish time and place -romance, including development of the romantic theme and technique for leading to the moment of the kiss -science fiction, fantasy, alien worlds, alternate realities, supernatural events -horror, stalking, assault and murder -reality TV, including the use of sound design and synthetic nonmelodic patterns -classic TV and feature-length documentary, as well as persuasive or propagandistic As a focused continuation of Advanced Scoring 1, students will further strengthen skills in scene analysis, character reading, psychological persuasion and enchantment (esp. with respect to lowering threshold of belief in sci-fi and fantasy). Genre scoring also allows composers to explore more deeply their own emotional and psychological processes in order to produce scores that support content in all varieties of visual media, including interactive experiences. Taken in tandem with FS-531, Directed Studies in Linear and Interactive Scoring 2, as the second phase of a theory and practice sequence.

FS-530

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Lucio Godoy
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: SFTV graduate students
Electable by: SFTV graduate students
Prerequisites: Written approval of program director
Department Code: SFTV

An advanced practicum that provides individual students with personal mentoring and introduces them to the one-to-one filmmaker-composer collaborative model. With active support and critical appraisal from senior faculty, the student is challenged to conceptualize and execute a plan for scoring a personal slate of short projects, narrative and non-narrative, linear and non-linear, that link to and address critical aspects of his or her overall thesis plan. Drawing on both previously acquired music skills and scoring techniques learned in the co-requisite Advanced Scoring 1: Narrative Analysis, students will demonstrate the ability to convey creative intentions, respond to critical direction, and work intensively to meet deadlines set in tandem with their faculty advisor. The end goal is clearer definition of the thesis objective. Scoring assignments may be drawn from linear and non-linear visual content either submitted by the student or selected by faculty in collaboration with the student, utilizing electronic scoring techniques and/or live-player scoring sessions with students functioning as composer/conductor, or composer/producer.

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