Courses

e.g. AR or AR-211
e.g. Film or "Bass Lab"

Child and Adolescent Psychology

LSOC-411

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: MUED majors
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-201 and LSOC-211
Department: LART

This course is an opportunity for students to learn more about their own personal development and evolution up to this point, by examining theories and research regarding child and adolescent development, and by examining their own families of origin. Note: This course may be used to fulfill the social science requirement.

Abnormal Psychology

LSOC-421

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: MTHE majors
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-201 and LSOC-211
Department: LART

Using the classification of psychopathology contained in the current edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) as a guide, this course will explore the major psychopathology of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. This exploration will involve examining the etiology of each disorder, its symptomatology, and different treatment approaches. Note: This course may be used to fulfill the social science requirement.

Adult Development and Aging

LSOC-431

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: MTHE majors
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111 and LSOC-211
Department: LART

In this course, students explore adult development and aging. Students examine the research literature on psychological, social, biological, and teleological aspects of how adults mature; and explore issues such as relationships, professions, death, dying, and thriving in a difficult world. Students compare the psychoanalytic, cognitive-behavioral, and existential approaches, including the theories of Freud, Erikson, Kegan, Vygotsky, K bler-Ross, Prochaska, Gilligan, and Goleman. Through reflection, students apply theory to real personal and professional situations.

The Psychiatric Setting

LSOC-441

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111 and LSOC-211
Department: LART

Students will learn how to function in a variety of clinical and service related settings: hospitals, clinics, hospices, nursing homes, and educational and recreational centers. Factors to be studied include the principles of group dynamics, the presentation of cases, conflict resolution among ward teams, the nature of therapeutic relating, effective non-drug and drug-oriented treatment modalities, and the specific role of music therapy in relation to other modalities.

Gay, Lesbian, and Queer Culture

LSOC-P219

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Simone Pilon
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course explores the cultural life of homosexuality in America. What might it feel like to be gay or lesbian or queer, as both fantasized by heterosexuality and as lived by gays and lesbians? How is gay life different from straight experience? How do gays, lesbians, and queers understand themselves as gay? What are the aesthetics and sensibilities—losses, fantasies, desires, fears, and joys—which frame and enable gay identity, desire, and enjoyment, in the past, the present, and the future? This course addresses specifically gay, lesbian, queer, transgender, and bisexual selfhood and sociality in order to illuminate homosexual identities, desires, and pleasures. What is gay desire, both in culture, in history? How do homosexuals learn how to desire what they want to have and who they want to be? The purpose of the course is to illuminate the ways in which gayness expresses not simply a sexuality but also a personal lived experience through which queers grasp a sense of themselves and each other. In an historical and cultural examination of theory, philosophy, and literature, this course traces the transformations in gay culture over the latter half of the twentieth century to today. Does gayness have an essence, an identifiable center at its foundation which spans all spaces and times? Or, is queerness a playful masquerade in the negotiation of identity and desire in transient moments in culture and history? This course examines the modes of desire and demand, forms of identification and becoming, and styles of play and amusement through which gays, lesbians, and queers relate to themselves and each other. What does it mean to occupy the mind and the body—thinking, feeling, and being—of a gay individual? What does gay mean for straight outsiders and queer insiders? The horizon of the course is to enable us to better understand what we might mean when we say: I am gay. Who are we when we are homosexual? And who we?

Gender and Country Music

LSOC-P230

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course considers country music's songwriters, performers, and business people and how they reflect or inspire vari ous gender images and identities in society. Drawing on interdisciplinary discourse, students explore a variety of sources regarding country music and gender in society and examine multiple perspectives. Students analyze the relationships among gendered identities, country music, its audiences, and the music industry. Students also synthesize these identities and other cultural factors to express their ideas about gendered identities in country music and in popular society.

Sound and Society: The Social Life of Musical Practices

LSOC-P250

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course provides an introduction to issues, trends, and arguments in contemporary ethnomusicology, or the cultural study of music. As we listen to a variety of musical examples from Hindipop to hip-hop, we will examine these approaches actively through discussion, listening, and small-scale research projects. We will also engage with themes including youth culture, commercial music production, and cultural hybridity. Finally, we will ask how globalization has transformed musical practices and how we understand them today.

The R&B/Soul Business: The Roots of Hip-Hop

LSOC-P270

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This course exams the history of the music, artists, business leaders, and practices of one of the most important music genres of the 20th century: R&B/soul. Students explore the influence of the R&B/soul music personalities, and examine how they shaped business practices specific to the field. These practices created a blueprint for the current pop music field, dominated by such hip-hop music moguls as Russell Simmons, Jay-Z, and Sean Combs. The impact of the R&B/soul artists and business people—including artists Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, Stevie Wonder, Sly Stone, and Marvin Gaye; and producers Jimmy Jam, Terry Lewis, Teddy Riley, L.A. Reid, Babyface, Kenny Gamble, Leon Huff, Ahmet Ertegun, Berry Gordy, and Dick Griffey—will be investigated through listening, lecture, discussion and research.

From Boys to Men: Masculinity in Contemporary Society

LSOC-P281

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111
Department: LART

This interdisciplinary course investigates the ways in which masculinity is constructed in contemporary society. Through the lens offered by Masculinity Studies—a field that emerged directly from the work done in feminist studies and gender studies—we will investigate how boys become men, how social structures affect boys' and men's lives, and the subsequent effects on both women's and men's lives. Material will be from the disciplines of psychology, sociology, and science, and will also include autobiographical essays and short stories. We will also be viewing films and examining musical styles.

City Blues

LSOC-P300

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Spring Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-201
Department: LART

When songwriter/poets portray a city through the blues, they choose gritty lyrics to reflect its tough side. They sing about their own struggle to remember the dream that seduced them to come to live and strive in the city. This course looks at those urban blues that challenge one's everyday existence. Noise, high rent, and crowding are inconvenient. Unemployment, health risks, kids at risk, underemployment, housing shortages, homelessness, and crime are serious problems. These city ills trap many of its residents and yet, an impressively large number survive and thrive because of the city. In this course, you will look at city blues through the lens of sociology and enjoy the music inspired by the city. Assigned readings, group discussion projects, and analytical memos will help you gain a deeper understanding of the complexity of urban problems. The course will highlight today's successful urban community organizations and urban change agents, partnerships, sponsorships, and resources that musician change agents must know about to power through and turn around the city's blues.

Existential Psychoanalytic Theory and Life

LSOC-P451

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall Only
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: LENG-111 and LSOC-211
Department: LART

The course examines psychoanalysis and existential therapy. Students learn both traditional and current developments in the field. Students will review of the work of Sigmund Freud, Medard Boss, Rollo May, and Viktor Frankl. Key questions for exploration include: Why do people do the things that they do? How can we free ourselves from our compulsion to repeat? We will explore the powerful forces that compel us to act out unconscious scripts. Issues covered will include: the repetition compulsion of addiction, the tyranny of anxiety and fear, the possibility of purpose, freedom and responsibility, love and will, and the relationship between dreaming and authentic living. A willingness to develop self-reflection is required.

Introductory Spanish 1

LSPN-161

3 credit(s)
Course Chair: Darla Hanley
Semesters Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
Required of: None
Electable by: All
Prerequisites: None
Department: LART

This course covers basic grammar, composition, and cultural reading selections. The emphasis is on pronunciation and conversational Spanish. Note: This course is not available for credit to students for whom this is a first language.

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